One Thing I Did Right in Ministry… [Blog Series | Founders]

Don’t miss these helpful insights from the recent series on the Founders Blog:

One Thing I Did Right in Ministry…

“I started a Book Table”  (Tom Ascol)
“I waited on God” (Jeff Johnson)
“I did Expository Preaching” (Phil Newton)
“I started a Pastoral Internship” (Jeff Robinson)
“I centered on Christ” (Tom Hicks)
“Expository Preaching” (Steve Weaver)
“Kindness” (Fred Malone)
“I didn’t Lead Alone” (Scott Slayton)
“Pastoral Care” (Shawn Merithew)
“I Learned from my Failures” (Joe Thorn)

New Book: “A Noble Company, Vol. 8: Biographical Essays of Notable Particular-Regular Baptists in America” [Particular Baptist Press]

A Noble Company

Biographical Essays on Notable
Particular-Regular Baptists in America
Volume 8

Edited by Terry Wolever

Particular Baptist Press:

Our latest release… is now available!!! Get your copy today – $34 plus shipping.

Details:

Volume 8 contains essays on twenty more men and women from the early to mid-nineteenth century, a period known for its great missionary outreach. Hardcover. Bound in Navy cloth vellum with gold stamping. 702 pages. Illustrated with some rare portraits and other pictures. Three extensive indexes – Persons, Subjects and Churches.

The essays contained in this volume are [links give short description]:

1. David Benedict (1779-1874) by Matthew L. Underwood

2. Lott Carey (c.1780-1828) by Albert W. Wardin, Jr.

3. John Peck (1780-1849) by Terry Wolever

4. Alfred Bennett (1780-1851) by Jeffrey P. Straub

5. John Kerr (1782-1843) by Johnny Truelove

6. Daniel Hascall (1782-1852) by William Brackney & Terry Wolever

7. Luther Rice (1783-1836) by John Mark Terry

8. Silas Mercer Noel (1783-1839) by Steve Weaver

9. Alexander M. Beebee (1783-1856) by Terry Wolever

10. Thomas Roberts (1783-1865) by Micah Caswell

11. Isaac McCoy (1784-1846) by Gary W. Long

12. Charles Bartolette (1784-1852) by Terry Wolever

13. William Palmer (1785-1853) by Jeffrey A. Waldrop

14. Spencer H. Cone (1785-1855) by Matthew C. Hoskinson

15. Thomas Conant (1785-1870) by Jeffrey A. Waldrop

16. Jonathan Going (1786-1844) by Bill J. Leonard

17. Christiana P. McCoy (1787-1850) by Gary W. Long

18. Adoniram Judson, Jr. (1788-1850) by Jerry Cain

19. Samuel Eastman (1788-1858) by C. Douglas Weaver

20. Ann H. Judson (1789-1826) by Sharon James

There are seven appendixes:

A. Covenant, Articles of Faith, and Rules of Discipline of the First Baptist Church, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, 1805. David Benedict, pastor

B. Principles (or Articles of Faith) adopted at the constitution of the Maria Creek Baptist Church, Indiana Territory, May 20, 1809

C. Letter from Luther Rice to Mr. Wilson, dated Washington, D.C., April 29, 1823

D. Charter of the First Particular Baptist Church (later First Baptist Church) of Paterson, New Jersey, July 31, 1824

E. The Constitution of the Central New Jersey Baptist Association, formed at Hightstown, New Jersey, October 25, 1828

F. A Burman Liturgy, composed by Adoniram Judson, 1829, translated into English

G. Letter from Spencer H. Cone to John W. Sarles, dated New York, November 2, 1847

Lastly, this volume includes a listing of the individual essays and contributing writers in A Noble Company, Volumes 1-7

Learn more about Particular Baptist Press in our interview with them.

Hercules Collins Funeral Sermon [Excerpt & Full Audiobook]

hercules-collins-funeral-sermonSteve Weaver:

Hercules Collins died on October 4, 1702. He was interred five days later at Bunhill Fields, the burial ground of dissenters. His funeral sermon was preached by John Piggott, a Seventh-Day Baptist who was renown for his funeral sermons. He preached a number of sermons around this time at the funeral services of prominent London Baptist pastors. The sermon was based on Matthew 24:44, “Therefore be ye also ready; for in such an Hour as you think not, the Son of Man cometh.

The first part of the sermon focused on the biblical text. The latter part of the sermon summarized the life of Collins. This section of the sermon is excerpted below.

In such a posture of soul was he, whose death occasions this discourse. I doubt not but he was actually as well as habitually ready; you know I mean your late worthy pastor Mr. Hercules Collins, concerning whom I have need to say the less, because his doctrine you have heard, and his example you have seen for so many years; the former was agreeable to the sentiments of the reformed churches in all fundamental articles of faith, and the latter such as did adorn the doctrine of God our Saviour…

Read the rest of the second section.

Full Audio [previous posted]:

MP3:

Sep. 19-21, 2016 “The Diversity of Dissent” Andrew Fuller Center 10th Annual Conf. in Louisville, KY.

Baptist origins lie within the matrix of the renewal movement known to history as Puritanism. They were not the only community to emerge from this renewal, however: English Presbyterians and Congregationalists also trace their beginnings back to Puritanism. But despite this common ancestry, these communities had their differences.

ep-267-2016-andrew-fuller-conference-hero-image

In this tenth annual conference of The Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies, co-sponsored this year by The Davenant Trust, we trace this diversity through the lives and thought of three leading Puritans of the late Stuart era (1660–1714)—the Presbyterian Richard Baxter, the Congregationalist John Owen, and the Baptist William Kiffen—all of whom were born within a year or so of each other, in 1615 and 1616. Do join us as we think about the thought and ongoing legacy of these three extremely important Christian authors.

Schedule, Speakers, & Topics:

Monday, September 19

7:30 a.m. Check-In
8:30 a.m. General Session 1: Timothy Beougher
“As a dying man to dying men: The life and ministry of Richard Baxter”

10:00 a.m. General Session 2: Crawford Gribben
“Becoming John Owen: A Puritan among Evangelicals”

11:30 a.m. General Session 3: Michael Haykin
” ‘By the compass of the Word’: The life and piety of William Kiffen (1616-1701)”

1:00 p.m. Lunch
3:00 p.m. Parallel Sessions
6:00 p.m. Dinner*
8:00 p.m. General Session 4: Herman Selderhuis
“‘…and yet be loth to die?’ Death and dying in the theologies of John Owen and Richard Baxter”

Tuesday, September 20

8:30 a.m. General Session 5: Seth Osborne
“A double-edged sword: Marriage as a hindrance and helper to the pastor’s piety in Richard Baxter”

10:00 a.m. Chapel
11:30 General Session 6: Tim Cooper
“John Owen, Richard Baxter and the battle for Calvin in later-seventeenth-century England”

1:00 p.m. Lunch
2:30 p.m. General Session 7: Russell Fuller
“John Owen and the traditional Protestant view of the Hebrew Old Testament”

4:00 p.m. General Session 12: Nathan Finn
“Renewal through retrieval: The rediscovery of John Owen by 20th-century Reformed & Evangelical Christians”
6:00 p.m. Dinner
8:00 p.m. General Session 9: Steve Weaver
“William Kiffen, John Bunyan, and the open communion controversy”

9:15 p.m. Lifeway Dessert Reception
Wednesday, September 21

8:30 a.m. General Session 10: Jonathan Arnold
“Keach’s foil: Benjamin Keach and the fight against Baxterianism”

10:00 a.m. General Session 11: David Sytsma
“Richard Baxter conformed to Nonconformity: The modern reception of Baxter as a practical theologian”

11:30 a.m.
General Session 8: Shawn Wright
“Justification by faith alone: The perspectives of John Owen and William Kiffen”

*All attendees are invited to this dinner

MORE DETAILS

Religious Liberty For Muslims: A Baptist Tradition [Steve Weaver]

“It is the will and command of God that, since the coming of his Son the Lord Jesus, a permission of the most Paganish, Jewish, Turkish, or anti-christian consciences and worships be granted to all men in all nations and countries.” Roger Williams, The Bloudy Tenent of Persecution (1644)

Baptists have historically argued for the religious liberty of all people. As a group that was persecuted in their early days, Baptists have consistently argued for four hundred years that the civil government does not have authority over the consciences of citizens. Baptists have recognized that we either have religious liberty for all or not at all. If the government can take someone else’s freedom today, they can take yours tomorrow. Below is a list of quotes evidencing Baptists’ historic commitment to religious liberty. These could be multiplied many times over. The unique thing about the quotations below is not their advocacy of religious liberty for all, but that they specifically identify Muslims as deserving freedom to practice their religion freely. (Note: “Turks” and “Turkish” was used as an identifier of Muslims.)

“For men’s religion to God is between God and themselves. The king shall not answer for it. Neither may the king be judge between God and man. Let them be heretics, Turks, Jews, or whatsoever, it appertains not to the earthly power to punish them in the least measure. This is made evident to our lord the king by the scriptures.” Thomas Helwys, A Short Declaration of the Mystery of Iniquity (1612)

“It is the will and command of God that, since the coming of his Son the Lord Jesus, a permission of the most Paganish, Jewish, Turkish, or anti-christian consciences and worships be granted to all men in all nations and countries.” Roger Williams, The Bloudy Tenent of Persecution (1644)

Roger Williams also cited in a positive fashion that Oliver Cromwell once maintained in a public discussion “with much Christian zeal and affection for his own conscience that he had rather that Mahumetanism [i.e. Mohammedanism or Islam] were permitted amongst us, than that one of God’s Children should be persecuted.”

“The liberty I contend for is more than toleration. The very idea of toleration is despicable; it supposes that some have a pre-eminence above the rest to grant indulgence, whereas all should be equally free, Jews, Turks, Pagans and Christians.” John Leland, “The Virginia Chronicle” (1790)

To add contemporary Baptist voices, I could add these excellent pieces by my friends Russell Moore and Bart Barber. These men and their arguments are right in step with the larger Baptist tradition of defending religious liberty for all.

Source

New Booklet: “1689 Confession’s Influence on Early American Missons & Church Planting” by Steve Weaver

weaver_fullcolor

The 1689 Baptist Confession and Its Influence on Early American Missons and Church Planting

by Steve Weaver

Description:

Pastor Steve Weaver
Pastor Steve Weaver

By showing that the original signers of the confession were evangelistic and missions-minded and by showing that those who held to the confession in North America were also evangelistic and missions-minded, it is hoped that we can lay to rest the mistaken notion that those who held to the 1689 Baptist Confession and its theological descendants in America – the Philadelphia and Charleston Confessions – were unconcerned and uninvolved in the work of missions and church planting.

Details:

  • $2.00
  • 80 lb. cover
  • Staple-booklet binding
  • 35 pgs.
  • Published by Reformed Baptist Faith and Family Ministry

Reformed Baptist Faith and Family MinistryReformed Baptist Faith & Family (RBFF) is a non-profit Christian printing and publishing ministry, which exists to provide the Churches of Jesus Christ with quality resources aimed at equipping, exhorting and encouraging her members while remaining committed to the biblical truths as preserved in the 1689 Second London Baptist Confession of Faith (1689 Baptist Confession).

 

Standing on the shoulders of giants: The preacher & his books [Steve Weaver | Hercules Collins | Spurgeon]

Pastor Steve Weaver gives an encouragement for pastors to learn from others by way of reading. Here is a snippet with quotes from Hercules Collins and C. H. Spurgeon :

Historically, Baptists have recognized the importance of learning from the works of others. In his book on pastoral ministry, The Temple Repair’d, the seventeenth-century English Baptist pastor Hercules Collins provided his readers with a list of recommend books [see/read them here]. Furthermore, when young men in his Wapping church expressed a desire to begin preaching, they were provided with key biblical and theological works. Collins believed that ministers must labor in their study of the Word of God because of the exalted nature of their work as ministers. Collins-signature2-480x320Commenting on 2 Timothy 2:15, he wrote,

“We should study to be good workmen because our work is of the highest nature. Men that work among jewels and precious Stones ought to be very knowing of their business. A minister’s work is a great work, a holy work, a heavenly work. Hence the Apostle says “Who is sufficient for these things?” O how great a work is this! What man, what angel is sufficient to preach the gospel as they ought to preach it! You work for the highest end, the glory of God, and the good of immortal souls. You are for the beating down of the kingdom of the devil, and enlarging and exalting Christ’s kingdom.”

Pastor Steve Weaver
Pastor Steve Weaver

The tendency to downplay the importance of reading and studying books in one’s preparation for preaching has been a perennial issue. Some have sought to downplay the importance of God-honoring books out of false sense of piety. But even the apostle Paul, when in prison, urged Timothy to bring “the books” (2 Tim. 4:13). The nineteenth-century’s Prince of Preachers Charles Haddon Spurgeon commented on the example of Paul in a sermon on 2 Timothy 4:13 titled “Paul—His Cloak and His Books.”

C. H. Spurgeon
C. H. Spurgeon

“He is inspired, and yet he wants books! He has seen the Lord, and yet he wants books! He has had wider experience than most men, and yet he wants books! He had been caught up in the third heaven, and had heard things unlawful for a man to utter, yet he wants books! He has written a major part of the New Testament, and yet he wants books! The apostle says to Timothy and so he says to every Christian, “Give thyself to reading.” The man who never reads will never be read; he who never quotes will never be quoted. He who will not use the thoughts of other men’s brains proves he has no brains of his own.”

Read “Standing on the shoulders of giants: The preacher and his books”.

New Book: “Orthodox, Puritan, Baptist: Hercules Collins (1647-1702) & Particular Baptist Identity in Early Modern England” by Steve Weaver [V&R]

Weaver Collins Book

Orthodox, Puritan, Baptist
Hercules Collins (1647–1702) and Particular Baptist Identity in Early Modern England

by G. Stephen Weaver, Jr.

[V&R: Hardcover 69,99 €  | PDF eBook 59,99 € | AMZ: $88 (currently showing out of stock)]

Description:

Steve Weaver
Author Steve Weaver

The life and writings of Hercules Collins provide a window into understanding how seventeenth-century Baptists viewed themselves in relationship to historic Christianity and Puritan orthodoxy: Collins was not only a respected member of the Particular Baptist community, but was also a faithful representative of that community. G. Stephen Weaver Jr.’s examination of Collins’ commitment to historic Christianity and Protestant orthodoxy serves as an opportunity to understand better the doctrinal commitments of seventeenth-century English Particular Baptists.

Table of Contents & Foreword by Crawford Gribben [10-page PDF]:

Download (PDF, 84KB)

Details:

Hardcover: 238 pages
Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht GmbH & Co KG


Related Resources:

We previously interviewed Pastor Steve Weaver on Hercules Collins’ life and his “An Orthodox Catechism”:
PodcastPromo28PodcastPromo Steve Weaver Hercules Collins An Orthodox Catechism


See all post related to Hercules Collins:
Hercules Collins

 

Audio from ‘The Legacy of Andrew Fuller’ Conference Now Online feat. Haykin, Weaver + more

Fuller Mini 2015 ConfAndrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies:

On February 6, 2015, The Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies hosted a mini-conference to consider the legacy of Andrew Fuller. 2015 marks the bicentennial of Fuller’s death so it was appropriate The Andrew Fuller Center devote some time to assessing his legacy. As an added bonus, the conference date of February 6th was the 261st birthday of Fuller. The conference was hosted on the third floor of the Legacy Hotel on the campus of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. We are pleased to make available the audio from the conference free of charge below:

Conference Audio:

Why Andrew Fuller?” (MP3) a brief intro to the conference by Dr. Michael A.G. Haykin (Professor of Church History and Director of AFCBS at SBTS)

“Fuller and the 19th Century Southern Baptists” (MP3) by Dr. Gregory A. Wills (Professor of Church History and Dean of School of Theology at SBTS)

“C.H. Spurgeon: a Fullerite?” (MP3) by Dr. G. Stephen Weaver, Jr. (Research Assistant and Fellow of AFCBS)

Out Now: ‘Recovering a Covenantal Heritage: Essays in Baptist Covenant Theology’ [RBAP]

Recovering Covenantal Heritage

$27.29 | £22.98 ]

Per Richard Barcellos, RBAP should be getting their copies around the 10th and will be selling them for around $10 less.


Here is the Table of Contents: 

Preface – Richard C. Barcellos, Ph.D.

Introduction – James M. Renihan, Ph.D.

 

Historical

 1. A Brief Overview of Seventeenth-Century Reformed Orthodox Federalism – Richard C. Barcellos, Ph.D.

2. Covenant Theology in the First and Second London Confessions of Faith – James M. Renihan, Ph.D.

3. By Farther Steps: A Seventeenth-Century Particular Baptist Covenant Theology – Pascal Denault, Th.M.

4. The Puritan Argument for the Immersion of Believers: How Seventeenth-Century Baptists Utilized the Regulative Principle of Worship – G. Stephen Weaver, Jr., Ph. D.

5. The Antipaedobaptism of John Tombes – Michael T. Renihan, Ph.D.

6. The Abrahamic Covenant in the Thought of John Tombes – Michael T. Renihan, Ph.D.

7. John Owen on the Mosaic Covenant – Thomas E. Hicks, Jr., Ph.D.

8. A ‘Novel’ Approach to Credobaptist and Paedobaptist Polemics – Jeffrey A. Massey

 

Biblical

 9. The Fatal Flaw of Infant Baptism: The Dichotomous Nature of the Abrahamic Covenant – Jeffrey D. Johnson

10. The Difference Between the Old and New Covenants: John Owen on Hebrews 8:6 –  John Owen

11. The Newness of the New Covenant (Part 1) – James R. White, Th.D.

12. The Newness of the New Covenant (Part 2) – James R. White, Th.D.

13. Acts 2:39 in its Context: An Exegetical Summary of Acts 2:39 and Paedobaptism (Part 1) – Jamin Hübner

14. Acts 2:39 in its Context: Case Studies in Paedobaptist Interpretations of Acts 2:39 (Part 2) – Jamin Hübner

15. An Exegetical Appraisal of Colossians 2:11-12 – Richard C. Barcellos, Ph.D.

 

Biblical-Theological

 16. Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology and Biblical Theology – Micah and Samuel Renihan

 

Scripture Index

Name and Subject Index

Samples: Preface |  Intro | Chapter 1 | Chapter 10

Paperback: 532 pages

2014 ‘1689 Conference’ AUDIO & VIDEO now online

1689 Conference Spurgeon

1689 Conf1689 Conference Planner:

This year we gathered to commemorate the 325th anniversary of the historic 1689 Baptist Confession.

 

Our hearts were lifted and our commitment to Scripture renewed as we reflected upon the kind providence of our covenant God toward His people.

 

The LORD was pleased to bless the conference with a precious unity of hearts and a single focus on orthodox confessional truths, that we pray will fortify and equip our gospel churches to proclaim the Lordship of Christ to all the nations.

 

In addition, the LORD through the working of His Spirit begun a confessing, reformed Baptist pastoral fellowship that will begin to meet bi-monthly in the central Indianapolis area.  If you would like to be notified of the date and location of the meetings do so by sending your request to: info@1689conference.org

 

We pray that the Lord will bless and keep you all, hope to see you again next year – LORD willing!

Baptist Confessionalism Providence 1689 Conference WIlliam Kiffin

AUDIO | VIDEO [Playlist]:

DAY 1:

Jim Savastio – 1689 Baptist Confession, 325 yrs. of faithfulness to the gospel [mp3]:

Video Part 1:

Please note that there are two videos in this list that were cut off short, however the MP3 audio of all the sessions are complete in length.

Video 2:


 

DAY 2:

Dr. Sam Waldron – 1689 Baptist Confession, outline, theology and distinctives [mp3]:

Video:


 

Bob Bolles – 1689 Baptist Confession and the Gospel [mp3]:

Video:


 

Doug Barger – Baptists, creeds/confessions and Silver Creek Baptist Church (Indiana’s first Baptist Church) [mp3]:

Video Part 1:

Video Part 2:


 

Steve Weaver – 1689 Baptist Confession and missions [mp3]:

Video:


 

Jim Savastio – How NOT to reform a church [mp3]:

Video:


 

Sonny Hernandez – 1689 Baptist Confession, the regulative principle of worship [mp3]:

Video:


 

David Williams – 1689 Baptist Confession and personal sanctification [mp3]:

Video:


 

Dennis Clark – Contemporary concerns for the church [mp3]:

Video:


 

Doug Barger – 1689 Baptist Confession, Family Worship and Cathechisms [mp3]:

Video:


 

Pascal Denualt – Covenant theology and the church. 1689 Federalism [mp3]:

Video:


Day 3:

Dr. Sam Waldron – 1689 Baptist Confession the Law and Gospel [mp3]:

Video:


 

Question and answer session – Topics include: law, future vision for confessing reformed baptists, hyper calvinism… [mp3]:

Video:


 

James Brown – Sermon of encouragement and exhortation [mp3]:

Video:

The Church of Christ, who upon Confession of Faith have bin Baptised: Hercules Collins & Baptist Ecclesiology [PDF] By Steve Weaver

Hercules Collins

Below is the PDF of the paper that Steve Weaver presented at the 66th Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society in San Diego, California on November 19, 2014.

You may purchase the audio for $3 here.

The Church of Christ, who upon Confession of Faith have bin Baptised: Hercules Collins and Baptist Ecclesiology

[19-Page PDF]:

Download (PDF, 440KB)

 [source: Steve Weaver]

Steve Weaver gives us more previews of the ‘Baptists, Confessionalism & the Providence of God’ Conference [2 Short VIDEOS]

Baptist Confessionalism Providence 1689 Conference WIlliam Kiffin

Last week we got a preview from Sam Waldron, this week Steve Weaver gives us a preview of his topic(s) at the upcoming “Baptists, Confessionalism & the Providence of God” Conference (Nov. 13-15, 2014 in Indianapolis, IN.) that we previously mentioned.

[The Mission-Minded Framers of the 1689 – 1 min. vid.]

[How the 1689 came to America – 2 min. vid.]

325 years ago today the 1st General Assembly of Particular Baptists (1689) met

1689-ga-cover-page

325 years ago today the 1st General Assembly of Particular Baptists (1689) met! On this occasion Steve Weaver writes:

After the Act of Toleration, which was passed by Parliament in 1688 and enacted by the king on May 24, 1689, dissenters began to exercise their new-found freedom to assemble publicly to great avail. In 1689, the Baptists gathered in London for their first national assembly. This group of “divers Pastors, Messengers and Ministring Brethren of the Baptized Churches” met in London from September 3-12, 1689, and claimed to represent “more than one hundred Congregations of the same Faith with Themselves.” The common faith which distinguished this group of churches is specified on the cover page as “the Doctrine of Personal Election, and final Perseverance.” This group would further identify themselves in their first meeting by adopting what would become known as the Second London Confession of Faith. This confession was originally composed and published in 1677…

Read “The First General Assembly of Particular Baptists (1689)”