Pastor Rob Ventura & his Wife discuss Race, the Gospel & Homeschooling [VIDEO]

Here is what the creator of the video (Suhylah Claudio) says about it:

“There’s no overarching title for the series of videos yet, but the focus is the same for all of them:

To share the varying perspectives on race, ethnicity, culture, and nationality from various ethnic backgrounds. The purpose is to dispel myths and stereotypes and expose points of view from those whom we may not feel are “like us” and ultimately to think about what Scripture says about these things. My goal is to help unite us as one race of Christians who are aware of the perceptions and experiences of one another so that we can be more sensitive and loving as brethren in Christ.”

30 minute video:

AUDIO from the 2014 Transforming Marriage Conf. feat. Voddie Baucham

Note that the first two sessions aren’t online:

Transforming Marriage Voddie Baucham

Covenant Baptist Church:

Transforming MarrageThis past weekend, Sep 26-28 [2014], Covenant Baptist was privileged to host a Transforming Marriage Conference with Dr. Voddie Baucham. We were thrilled to have him and hear his teaching on the theology of marriage as an institution, established by God, and the practical admonitions from God’s Word. We were also blessed to have him for a men’s fellowship and for our services on Sunday. His sermon on “Worthy of Worship” compelled us to a new commitment to Christ. His evening seminar on LGBT as “the new black” informed us as to how to respond to a culture that is completely illogical and unbiblical in its acceptance of this premise put forth by activists from the homosexual agenda. You will find both of these messages below and we encourage you to listen to them.

AUDIO:

Understanding Manhood | Session 3

There is a great deal of confusion over so-called “gender roles” in our culture. We are no longer clear on what it means to be a man, or what it means to be a woman. As a result, many couples struggle to define their roles without the benefit of a standard

This session [and the next] will establish a clear biblical grid through which to evaluate our roles.

mp3:

Understanding Womanhood | Session 4

mp3:

Q & A with Dr. Voddie Baucham | Session 5

Dr. Voddie Baucham answering questions from Michael Lee

mp3:

Worthy of Worship | Session 6

Revelation 1:1-6

mp3:

Not Like Being Black | Session 7

mp3:

Is Gay Now the New Black? Voddie Baucham Answers [4 Min. VIDEO]

Desiring God:

Voddie Baucham exposes the similarities between the Civil Rights Movement and the so-called Gay Rights Movement, while pointing out the significant difference between ethnicity and sexual orientation.

4 min. vid:

Transcript [lightly edited]:

What is the difference between the Civil Rights Movement and the so-called Gay Rights Movement of today? Not a whole lot. Unfortunately, I think there are some things that we accepted philosophically in the Civil Rights Movement that were not based in biblical truth. And those things are being applied in the Gay Rights Movement the exact same way and now we are calling them out.

For example, the idea of seeing people as constituencies and seeing rights as rights for constituencies of people is prominent in both movements. This continued division based on our constituencies and so-called communities is problematic. We’ve embraced a hyphenated understanding of ourselves as opposed to a view that sees us as one people.

The homosexual community is latching onto some of those very concepts. These concepts, by the way, are rooted and grounded in cultural Marxism. That was the goal of Gramscian Marxism. Divide people up into constituencies, and then the way you gain power is by making promises and representing particular constituencies. Now you never give them what you promise, but by creating this idea of constituencies and being the one who is the representative of the constituencies, you gain power and you keep your power to the degree that things don’t get better for your constituency. If things get better for your constituency, you lose your power.

So even when gains are made, you have to downplay those and go looking for other things that are problems. That is the way you keep your power.

The homosexual community has latched onto that approach and has identified itself as a constituency deserving of our attention and pity. They did so intentionally using the AIDS crisis. The direct result is they now have achieved a one-to-one correlation that we are finding it very hard to move away from.

So are there differences between ethnicity and so-called sexual orientation? Absolutely there are. Ethnicity is innate and unchangeable. So-called sexual orientation is not innate and is changeable. We know this. First Corinthians 6 is two-thousand-year-old evidence that people can stop being gay. So we know that it is neither innate, nor is it unchangeable. There are huge differences between the two. However, if all you are doing is using the language of the culture and the idea of people as constituencies, then you end up right where we are, and it is hard to stop that train.

TGC15 Media Now Available feat. Thabiti Anyabwile, Voddie Baucham + many more [AUDIO | VIDEO]

Media-Now-Available_350_248_90TGC:

Earlier this month we gathered in Orlando, Florida, for The Gospel Coalition 2015 National Conference, titled “Coming Home: New Heaven and New Earth.” More than 6,000 from 50 states and 50 countries came together to consider the theme of our eternal home. In addition to our conference attendees, more than 26,000 joined us through livestream from all 50 states and 137 different countries. Four live translations conveyed the conference message in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and Mandarin. Now all TGC15 media—9 main plenary sessions and more than 50 workshops—are available online. All of this content is free, and we encourage you to share it. You can also browse the conference photo gallery

Of particular interest:

mp3:

“Experience isn’t everything” (one minute video snippet from the above):


mp3:

“The federal headship of Jesus” (two minute video snippet from the above ):

‘A Conversation about Ferguson’ [VIDEO] feat. Voddie Baucham + more [RAAN]

Ferguson_Day_6_Picture_44Here is the video of Phillip Holmes, of the Reformed African American Network,  moderating a cyber-panel that took place last night [Dec. 2, 2014]. :

…featuring Lecrae, James White [of Christ Our King Community Church, Cary, NC], Voddie Baucham and B.J. Thompson regarding Ferguson.

 

Panelists will talk about their initial response, the root of the pain surrounding the events, the mission of the church and much more…

72 Min. Video:

Thoughts on Ferguson [Thabiti, Voddie, Chantry | UPDATED]

Ferguson Obama

Thabiti Anyabwile
Thabiti Anyabwile

Thabiti Anyabwile:

I am no politician or elected official. I’ve been around public policy enough to know that it’s no cure-all. I’m not misplacing my hope. I have no sense that doing these things will fix everything or usher in the kingdom of God.

 

But this I do know: There is no way people of good conscience or people of Christian faith can look at the events in Ferguson and conclude there’s nothing left for us to do or nothing that can be done. No, both pure religion and good citizenship require we not settle for what’s happened in the shooting of Michael Brown and the aftermath of the grand jury’s decision. The Ferguson grand jury has given us our marching orders. They have ordered us to march for a more just system of policing and the protection of all life. We are obligated–if we love Christ or love this country–to find a way forward to justice, a way suitable to the dictates of our individual consciences and the word of God. Perhaps you don’t agree with my feeble recommendations above. Great! That’s freedom in action. Now propose something better and let’s get to work.

READ “The Ferguson Grand Jury Has Given Us Our Marching Orders”

Voddie Baucham
Voddie Baucham

Voddie Baucham:

In the end, the best lesson my children can learn from Ferguson is not that they need to be on the lookout for white cops. It is far more important that I use this teachable moment to remind them that “God is not mocked, for whatever one sows, that will he also reap” (Gal. 6:7). Moments before his death, Michael Brown had violently robbed a man in a store. A man doing the best he could to make a living. Minutes later, Brown reaped what he sowed, and was gunned down in the street. That is the sad truth.

 

My sons have far more to fear from making bad choices than they have to fear from the police. The overwhelming majority of police officers are decent people just trying to make a living. They are much more likely to help you than to harm you. A life of thuggery, however, is NEVER your friend. In the end, it will cost you . . . sometimes, it costs you everything.

READ “Thoughts on Ferguson”

Update 5pm CST: Thabiti Anyabwile posted, “Why I Believe the Grand Jury Got It Wrong and Injustice Triumphed

Update Nov. 27, 2014: Thabiti Anyabwile posted, “Four Common But Misleading Themes in Ferguson-like Times

Update Nov. 29, 2014: Voddie Baucham was interviewed on FOX News [3 min. vid.]:

Update Dec. 1, 2014: Thabiti Anyabwile posted, “Spotting ‘Gospel Escapism’ in Evangelical Circles

Tom Chantry
Tom Chantry

Update Dec. 2, 2014: Tom Chantry posted, “What Voddie Said (and Didn’t)

Voddie Baucham posted his thoughts on the Gospel Coalition blog, and while many have linked to his thoughts, it seems to me that most who have interacted or evaluated have either misunderstood or misrepresented his statements. It’s fairly obvious that most have read Baucham’s remarks through their own personal tinted goggles, so maybe I have also. But I’ll tell you what I think anyway, because if I’m reading him correctly, he has said some genuinely wonderful things.

Update Dec. 2, 2014: Thabiti Anyabwile posted, “One Man’s Justice Another Man’s Nightmare: It Really Could Have Been Me

Update Dec. 8, 2014: Thabiti Anyabwile posted, “8 Suggestions for Applying the Gospel in Light of Brown, Grant, Gurley, Rice and Others

Update Dec. 10, 2014: Thabiti Anyabwile posted, “The Final Civil Rights Battle: Ending Police Brutality

Dec. 16, 2014 ‘A Time to Speak’ [Race, Church, Next Steps] feat. Voddie Baucham, Thabiti Anyabwile + more [LIVESTREAM 4-6pm CST]
time to speak livestream

Should churches make diversity their highest goal? Voddie Baucham answers [eMag]

Michael J. Kruger intros and highlights the RTS “Ministry & Leadership – Spring/Summer 2014”  interview with Voddie Baucham (which we briefly touched on in the last Dunker Bunker). Kruger writes:

When it comes to ethnic diversity, one of the most common refrains in our culture is that 11AM to 12Noon on Sundays is the most segregated hour of the week.   Such statements understandably raise important questions about our churches and ministries and whether they are focused enough on ethnic diversity.

 

However, African-American pastor Voddie Baucham, who leads Grace Family Baptist Church in Spring, Texas, is concerned about our culture’s incessant push for diversity–what he calls “cherished pluralism.”   In a recent interview with Ministry and Leadership, the magazine of Reformed Theological Seminary, Voddie offered some very helpful insights:

 

Voddie Baucham
Voddie Baucham

Q: How does the church adapt to the multicultural, multiethnic world we now live in?

 

We are at a place of cherished pluralism in much of modern American Christianity, and it’s dangerous. For example, you see one church with two different ethnicities, and another church with four different ethnicities, and you think the one with four different ethnicities has to be doing a better job of church, right? It may be, though, that that’s the neighborhood they are in, and they are no more welcoming or loving to people different than them. Or those four different ethnicities are broken up in four different pockets and they are not sharing community like they ought.

 

So, I’m very cautious about the push for diversity. I desire that all people would hear the gospel and be saved, that God would bring to his church all those whom he would call. The minute I start playing the diversity game, I’m in danger of stepping over certain lost people in favor of other lost people because I need to ramp up my ethnic diversity quota. And that’s usually problematic.

 

Q: How is it problematic?

 

In a number of ways–first, because we change our priorities. Instead of being set on faithfulness, now we’ve added another category. Faithfully preaching the gospel and seeing God bring whoever he brings is no longer enough. Now we have too many white people being saved, or too many black people being saved. Now I’m a failure because as the gospel is being preached and as God is drawing people, they don’t look like what we think we ought to look like. It’s not a biblical category of measuring success.

 

If there’s a problem with our not being welcoming or with being prejudiced toward people, then that’s sin, and we need to deal with that. But our goal is faithfulness in the gospel.

 

Q: It has been said that 11Am to noon on Sundays is the most segregated hour in our country. How valid is that statement, and how much of a concern is it?

 

Is it a valid statement? Probably. Is it reason for alarm? No, because people tend to go to church with people who are like them, and that’s always been the case. I don’t think we are seeing today what we saw in the 40′s and 50′s, where people were segregated because they were refused entrance. That’s simply not the case. So is the statement true? Sure, it could be. But is it better in those other hours of the week when people are together because they are forced together?

 

Inherently, in that statement, we’re saying that the church is wrong and awful because we are not seeing the demographic breakdown that other institutions are seeing during the week…Now we’re thinking we’re inferior to an institution that is forcing diversity on people, and that is simply not the case. If there’s sinful separation, that’s a problem, but the fact that people tend to congregate with people who are like them in a variety of ways is not necessarily a problem.

Read the entire five page interview.

Updated Holy Hip Hop Roundup [James White, Voddie Bauchman, Waldron, Walker + more]

Not wanting to flood our site/rss/email with every post on this topic, Ive been updating the Holy Hip Hop Roundup throughout the week. However, since some don’t see the social media notifications that we’ve added onto the list, I though it might be good to repost this with the updated post (in reverse order by date):


Special Dividing Line with Voddie Baucham, Shai Linne, and Ivey Conerly! by James White via Alpha and Omega Ministries

Tonight [Dec. 5, 2013] @ 5pm EST James White host Dr. Voddie Baucham, Shai Linne & Ivey Conerly on discussions regarding “Christian rap.”

James White:

Hope everyone will listen and consider carefully, especially since there were points of disagreement or divergence even amongst our panel.  Great time!

Audio:

Video:


 

Jeremy WalkerAsking the right questions by Jeremy Walker via Reformation21 Blog

At the risk of being trampled by the ireful in the latest slanging match over rap and hip-hop, I wonder if I might interject? It seems to me, watching from a distance and not trying to read every contribution, that the debate quickly escalates into absolute and swingeing declarations that fail to take account of the various issues that ought to come into play. I may be wrong, but I hope I can lob a few thoughts into the debate.
I suggest that there are at least three questions that ought to be asked in assessing not just rap and hip-hop but other musical genres and forms.

 

First, and most generically, in what ways can a Christian appreciate, enjoy and embrace either a form or genre of music in and of itself, or a particular instance of that form?

 

Second, and a little more narrowly, to what extent is a certain form or genre an appropriate vehicle for the communication of distinctively Christian truth?

 

But third, and most specifically, is this question: is a certain form or genre a legitimate and appropriate means for the corporate worship of the gathered church? This brings us into a whole new realm, for it raises the issue of the artist and his or her audience and the distinctive dynamics of the saints of God gathered in one place for the purpose of worshipping God. The answers to these questions are sometimes assumed in the debate, but often they have been neither raised nor addressed. I have offered some thoughts on these matters [15 min. readout] before…

Read [9 min. readout]


 

Sam WaldronReformed Rap Ruckus: Comments from the Empty Chair by Sam Waldron via Midwest Center for Theological Studies: Owensboro, KY  [added Dec. 4, 2013]

…Being old (Well 62!) and not particularly “Facebook and blog aware,” I was alerted to this controversy first by a much younger member of my church. After viewing the video and reading Ligon Duncan’s related comments, I wrote the following email to the to my younger, but like-minded, brother in the Lord. It is slightly edited for this blog.

 

It is pretty well known–at least I have made no secret of it–that I enjoy Shai Linne’s doctrinally solid raps. I have played them for college students in college classes with a good conscience and with gladness that they present the Christian religion in a different and contemporary cultural form. I think that as an art form and performance this may give them a helpfulness that other art forms and performance styles may not possess for today’s generation.

 

I certainly do not agree with many of the things the panelists said. . . . I am glad that Botkin apologized for the unfortunate things he said. I certainly do not agree with the very negative tone of the video as a whole about Reformed rap…

 

Since I wrote the above email both Scott Brown and Joel Beeke have issued apologies for aspects of their comments.  I think their apologies show wisdom and humility.  Both emphasize the distinction I am insisting on in this blog.  Let me only add that my ministry at the NCFIC conference emphasized the crucial distinction I was making at the Worship of God conference between the corporate worship of the church and other situations.  The question of whether Reformed rap may be a good and useful kind of performance art and thus evangelistic tool is very different from the question of whether any such performance art has any place in the formal worship of Christ’s church. These questions should be separated for a more fruitful discussion.

Read [4 min. listen]


scott brown

Please Forgive Me via Scott Brown Online [added Dec. 3, 2013]

During the panel discussion on rap I should have engaged such a controversial subject as this with greater discernment, explicit scriptural grounding, clarity, definition of terms (like “rap”) and precision that comes from a full grasp of the subject. These were lacking in the rap discussion. The very question itself lacked clarity and nuance which opened the door to the misrepresentations common to the broad brush. In framing the question, I failed to distinguish between the use of music in worship compared to simply listening to music. We failed to distinguish between the various expressions of the artists. I failed to correct a panelist who made an unsavory comment. Panel discussions, off the cuff are useful for certain things, but to use a surprise question to a panel to engage a broader audience on such a complex controversial topic as musical genres they may not have been knowledgeable of was unwise. I did not engage this topic with the required care. There were moments where it lacked the brotherly tone that is essential for our critiques within the body of Christ. In at least these senses, it was unworthy of our Lord. Please forgive me…

Read


 

Scott T. Brown put up An Apology on the NCFIC Blog:

A few days ago I released a video clip from a panel discussion at our conference on The Worship of God. One of the panelists, Geoff Botkin, referred to the people driving Christian rap as “disobedient cowards.” I interpreted his statement to mean that, in every culture, Christians are often cowards in the face of various elements of their cultures that are infected with worldliness. Geoff has explained to me that he did not intend to impugn the work of sincere men, and that he would like to apologize for any confusion caused by his statement. Here is his apology…

Read


 

origin_138347281Nicolas Alford, over at The Decablog, gave his own little roundup then wrote a parody entitled The NCFIC Boldly Speaks Out Against Reformed Country-Western: A Parody with a Point

I applaud the recent bold stance taken by the NCFIC against the growing popularity of a certain so-called “musical form” in the church.  For too long, we have looked the other way as Reformed country-western has gained steam.  Look around.  Our young men have hats with ridiculously large brims pulled down low over their eyes, their headphones in, slowing strumming the air as though they were out riding the countryside looking for stray steer.  Country-western “music” cannot be disassociated with the culture from which it originated- a culture rampant with the abuse of alcohol and spouses, where the jeans are too tight and every one is cryptically told to “cowboy up”- whatever that means.  The crooners of this so-called “art form” think they are serving God.  They’re not.  What these cowards don’t know is the hand which picks up the Bible must first lay down the lasso…

Read [12 min. readout]


 

holy hip hopThabiti Anyabwile did his own “Round-Up of the Holy Hip Hop Squabble” then gave his reactions:

  1. As I tweeted
  2. It’s good to see our white brothers take up arms so decisively against fellow white men in defense and confirmation of the truth.
  3. I’m glad for the restraint shown by the men who were the target of these comments.
  4. Finally, we need to be careful about extending labels in conversations like this.

Read [6 min. listen]

Holy Hip Hop Roundup [Anyabwile, Alford, Brown, White, Waldron] Updated Dec. 3rd & 4th

holy hip hopThabiti Anyabwile did his own “Round-Up of the Holy Hip Hop Squabble” then gave his reactions:

  1. As I tweeted
  2. It’s good to see our white brothers take up arms so decisively against fellow white men in defense and confirmation of the truth.
  3. I’m glad for the restraint shown by the men who were the target of these comments.
  4. Finally, we need to be careful about extending labels in conversations like this.

Read [6 min. listen]


 

origin_138347281Nicolas Alford, over at The Decablog, gave his own little roundup then wrote a parody entitled The NCFIC Boldly Speaks Out Against Reformed Country-Western: A Parody with a Point

I applaud the recent bold stance taken by the NCFIC against the growing popularity of a certain so-called “musical form” in the church.  For too long, we have looked the other way as Reformed country-western has gained steam.  Look around.  Our young men have hats with ridiculously large brims pulled down low over their eyes, their headphones in, slowing strumming the air as though they were out riding the countryside looking for stray steer.  Country-western “music” cannot be disassociated with the culture from which it originated- a culture rampant with the abuse of alcohol and spouses, where the jeans are too tight and every one is cryptically told to “cowboy up”- whatever that means.  The crooners of this so-called “art form” think they are serving God.  They’re not.  What these cowards don’t know is the hand which picks up the Bible must first lay down the lasso…

Read [12 min. readout]


 

Scott T. Brown put up An Apology on the NCFIC Blog:

A few days ago I released a video clip from a panel discussion at our conference on The Worship of God. One of the panelists, Geoff Botkin, referred to the people driving Christian rap as “disobedient cowards.” I interpreted his statement to mean that, in every culture, Christians are often cowards in the face of various elements of their cultures that are infected with worldliness. Geoff has explained to me that he did not intend to impugn the work of sincere men, and that he would like to apologize for any confusion caused by his statement. Here is his apology…

Read


scott brown

Please Forgive Me via Scott Brown Online [added Dec. 3, 2013]

During the panel discussion on rap I should have engaged such a controversial subject as this with greater discernment, explicit scriptural grounding, clarity, definition of terms (like “rap”) and precision that comes from a full grasp of the subject. These were lacking in the rap discussion. The very question itself lacked clarity and nuance which opened the door to the misrepresentations common to the broad brush. In framing the question, I failed to distinguish between the use of music in worship compared to simply listening to music. We failed to distinguish between the various expressions of the artists. I failed to correct a panelist who made an unsavory comment. Panel discussions, off the cuff are useful for certain things, but to use a surprise question to a panel to engage a broader audience on such a complex controversial topic as musical genres they may not have been knowledgeable of was unwise. I did not engage this topic with the required care. There were moments where it lacked the brotherly tone that is essential for our critiques within the body of Christ. In at least these senses, it was unworthy of our Lord. Please forgive me…

Read


 

Three Dividing Lines This Week by James White via Alpha and Omega Ministries [added Dec. 3, 2013]

Thursday at 5pm EST I will be joined by Dr. Voddie Baucham, Shai Linne and Ivey Conerly to discuss the recent explosion of discussion regarding “Christian rap.”

 


 

Sam WaldronReformed Rap Ruckus: Comments from the Empty Chair by Sam Waldron via Midwest Center for Theological Studies: Owensboro, KY  [added Dec. 4, 2013]

…Being old (Well 62!) and not particularly “Facebook and blog aware,” I was alerted to this controversy first by a much younger member of my church. After viewing the video and reading Ligon Duncan’s related comments, I wrote the following email to the to my younger, but like-minded, brother in the Lord. It is slightly edited for this blog.

 

It is pretty well known–at least I have made no secret of it–that I enjoy Shai Linne’s doctrinally solid raps. I have played them for college students in college classes with a good conscience and with gladness that they present the Christian religion in a different and contemporary cultural form. I think that as an art form and performance this may give them a helpfulness that other art forms and performance styles may not possess for today’s generation.

 

I certainly do not agree with many of the things the panelists said. . . . I am glad that Botkin apologized for the unfortunate things he said. I certainly do not agree with the very negative tone of the video as a whole about Reformed rap…

 

Since I wrote the above email both Scott Brown and Joel Beeke have issued apologies for aspects of their comments.  I think their apologies show wisdom and humility.  Both emphasize the distinction I am insisting on in this blog.  Let me only add that my ministry at the NCFIC conference emphasized the crucial distinction I was making at the Worship of God conference between the corporate worship of the church and other situations.  The question of whether Reformed rap may be a good and useful kind of performance art and thus evangelistic tool is very different from the question of whether any such performance art has any place in the formal worship of Christ’s church. These questions should be separated for a more fruitful discussion.

Read [4 min. listen]


 

Jeremy WalkerAsking the right questions by Jeremy Walker via Reformation21 Blog

At the risk of being trampled by the ireful in the latest slanging match over rap and hip-hop, I wonder if I might interject? It seems to me, watching from a distance and not trying to read every contribution, that the debate quickly escalates into absolute and swingeing declarations that fail to take account of the various issues that ought to come into play. I may be wrong, but I hope I can lob a few thoughts into the debate.
I suggest that there are at least three questions that ought to be asked in assessing not just rap and hip-hop but other musical genres and forms.

 

First, and most generically, in what ways can a Christian appreciate, enjoy and embrace either a form or genre of music in and of itself, or a particular instance of that form?

 

Second, and a little more narrowly, to what extent is a certain form or genre an appropriate vehicle for the communication of distinctively Christian truth?

 

But third, and most specifically, is this question: is a certain form or genre a legitimate and appropriate means for the corporate worship of the gathered church? This brings us into a whole new realm, for it raises the issue of the artist and his or her audience and the distinctive dynamics of the saints of God gathered in one place for the purpose of worshipping God. The answers to these questions are sometimes assumed in the debate, but often they have been neither raised nor addressed. I have offered some thoughts on these matters [15 min. readout]before…

Read [9 min. readout]

We’ll continue to add more from fellow 1689rs as/if they come out.

Aftermath of Trayvon Martin & Zimmerman Verdict – Thabiti Anyabwile

Thabiti Anyabwile, at his blog Pure Church, writes on what he is going to do in the aftermath of the Trayvon Martin and the Zimmerman verdict:

1. I’m going to play with my son.

2. I’m going to remember 1950.

3. I’m going to finally commit myself to a Quixotic quest to rid the world of “race” as a category of human identity.

4. I’m going to pray and preach.

Read the rest or listen to 10 minute readout.

Thabiti Anyabwile’s Final Wrap-Up Of His Discussion With Doug Wilson On “Black & Tan”

black and tanThabiti Anyabwile, on his blog Pure Church, posted a final wrap-up of his discussion with Douglas Wilson on Wilson’s book “Black & Tan: A Collection of Essays and Excursions on Slavery, Culture War, and Scripture in America“:

When our discussion first started, we were both surprised at how well it went, and both of us are very grateful to God, and to one another, for this great blessing. We have also been grateful to the readers and commenters who participated in this discussion in the same spirit, praying with us, and laboring to preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace (Eph. 4:3)…

Read their agreements, differences and conclusion.

At the beginning of this month, Thabiti posted a round-up of their back and forth:

For the past couple of weeks, Douglas Wilson and I have carried on a discussion of his book, Black and Tan. The book and its prequel, Southern Slavery As It Was, triggered controversy that’s lasted these last ten years or so. Our exchanges have been charitable and frequent. I thought it might be good to include a post-by-post round-up for anyone wishing to follow the discussion as it evolved…

See the links and summaries here.

Thabiti Anyabwile is Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church of Grand Cayman in the Grand Cayman Islands and a Council member with The Gospel Coalition. He tweets @ThabitiAnyabwil