New (Free) eBook: “The Lord’s Day” by Sam Waldron

The Lord’s Day
Its Presuppositions, Proofs, Precedents, and Practice

by Sam Waldron

Chapel Library: FREE | Kindle: $0.99

Description:

Dr. Sam Waldron

The Lord’s Day is a thoroughly up-to-date consideration of the Fourth Commandment and its ramifications for modern Christianity. Its four sections include the Presuppositions that influence our thinking; Proofs at creation, by Moses, and in the New Testament; Precedents in the Apostolic Fathers and John Calvin; and finally its Practice. While precise and careful, the author avoids extremes and makes the nuances and complexities of the theological issues clear for most Christians.

Pages: 138


[HT: Scott Brown]

[Upcoming book snippet] On the remaining sabbatismos for the people of God (Heb. 4:9) [Richard Barcellos]

Richard Barcellos:

taken from my forthcoming book by Founders Press, Getting the Garden Wrong: A Critique of New Covenant Theology on the Covenant of Works and the Sabbath

Copyright © 2016 Richard C. Barcellos. All rights reserved.

That which “remains” is “a Sabbath rest.” The noun “a Sabbath rest” (σαββατισμὸς [sabbatismos]) is used only here in the Bible. Various cognate forms of it are used in the Septuagint (LXX) in at least four places (Exod. 16:30; Lev. 23:32; 26:34; 2 Chron. 36:21). Each use in the LXX, when referring to men, refers to Sabbath-keeping in terms of an activity in the (then) here and now. Lincoln admits this, when he says, “In each of these places the term denotes the observance or celebration of the Sabbath.”[1] This can be seen especially in Exodus 16:30, Leviticus 23:32, and 26:35.

heb4

So the people rested (LXX: ἐσαββάτισεν [esabbatisen]; a verb) on the seventh day. (Exod. 16:30)

It is to be a sabbath (LXX: σάββατα [sabbata]; a noun) of complete rest (LXX: σαββάτων [sabbatōn]; a noun) to you, and you shall humble your souls; on the ninth of the month at evening, from evening until evening you shall keep (LXX: σαββατιεῖτε [sabbatieite]; a verb) your sabbath (LXX: τὰ σάββατα ὑμῶν [ta sabbata hymōn]; a noun). (Lev. 23:32)

All the days of its [i.e., the land’s] desolation it will observe the rest (LXX: σαββατιεῖ [sabbatiei]; a verb) which it did not observe (LXX: ἐσαββάτισεν [esabbatisen]; a verb) on your sabbaths (LXX: τοῖς σαββάτοις ὑμῶν [tois sabbatois hymōn]; a noun), while you were living on it. (Lev. 26:34-35)

Dr. Richard Barcellos
Dr. Richard Barcellos

Something interesting occurs in the LXX version of Leviticus 23:32a. The LXX text reads as follows: σάββατα σαββάτων ἔσται ὑμῖν (sabbata sabbatōn estai hymin). The NASB translates this verse: “It is to be a sabbath of complete rest to you.” The word σάββατα in the LXX compliments the verb “to be” (ἔσται). The word σαββάτων (“of complete rest”) modifies σάββατα. Both nouns clearly refer to an activity, a Sabbath-keeping to be rendered by those addressed in the passage. In Leviticus 23:32b of the LXX a verb is followed by its direct object as follows: σαββατιεῖτε τὰ σάββατα ὑμῶν (sabbatieite ta sabbata hymōn [“you shall keep your sabbath”]). Here a Sabbath for the people of God to keep is pressed upon them, explicitly by verbs and implicitly by nouns. Also, in each case the word “Sabbath” is the same used by Moses in Genesis 2:2, “and He rested on the seventh day” (emphasis added). Pertinent to our discussion as well is the fact that God’s creational rest in the LXX of Exodus 20:11 is referred to with the verb κατέπαυσεν (katepausen), the same word translated “rest” in Hebrews 3 and 4. In the LXX, what for the Creator is “rest” implies a Sabbath day to be kept for creatures. Hebrews 3 and 4 seem to follow this septuagintal pattern (see the discussion on divine rests above and the exposition of Heb. 4:10 below).

Robert P. Martin has an excellent discussion on the word “a Sabbath rest” (σαββατισμὸς [sabbatismos]). In the context of interacting with Andrew T. Lincoln, Martin says:

It is interesting that Lincoln acknowledges that “in each of these places [i.e., the LXX texts cited above] the term denotes the observance or celebration of the Sabbath,” i.e., not a Sabbath rest as a state to be entered into but a Sabbath-keeping as a practice to be observed. This, of course, corresponds to the word’s morphology, for the suffix —μoς indicates anaction and not just a state. This at least suggests that if the writer of Hebrews meant only “a Sabbath rest,” i.e., “a Sabbath state” to be entered into, he would have used the term σάββατον (“Sabbath”) or continued to use κατάπαυσις (“rest”), for he already had established the referent of κατάπαυσις as God’s own Sabbath rest which is to be entered into by faith (cf., 4:1, 3-4, 11). Thus σαββατισμὸς suggests a Sabbath action, i.e., “a Sabbath-keeping,” although the idea of a “a Sabbath state” is not necessarily excluded because of the overarching theme of the larger context.[2]

Throughout the passage thus far, the word translated “rest” is κατάπαυσις (katapausis). This word is also used in Hebrews 4:10-11. The shift from katapausis to sabbatismos at Hebrews 4:9 is deliberate.[3] But why the change? Joseph A. Pipa suggests the following:

The uniqueness of the word suggests a deliberate, theological purpose. He selects or coins sabbatismos because, in addition to referring to spiritual rest, it suggests as well an observance of that rest by a ‘Sabbath-keeping’. Because the promised rest lies ahead for the New Covenant people, they are to strive to enter the future rest. Yet as they do so, they anticipate it by continuing to keep the Sabbath.[4]

Notice that Pipa includes “spiritual rest” in his understanding of the word sabbatismos. This is an important observation, also made by Martin above (i.e., “the idea of ‘a Sabbath state’ is not necessarily excluded because of the overarching theme of the larger context”).

Though many commentators take sabbatismos as either salvation rest in Christ now and in the future or exclusively eschatological rest, its use here in light of the flow of the contextual argument and its LXX usages suggest a different meaning. The LXX use has already been noted. In the context of Hebrews 4:9-10, the divine rests referred to have at least three things in common:  1) a divine rest after a divine work; 2) a rest to be entered in terms of man’s obedience and worship in light of the divine work/rest; and 3) a day of rest as a pledge and token of the divine work/rest and of man’s entrance into it. Each divine rest as given to the people of God (i.e., at creation and Canaan) both had an abiding rest day remaining once the rest was instituted. If the other two divine rests included rest-keeping in the form of a Sabbath day, it is not without warrant to expect future divine rests (assuming they occur) to include the same. I am suggesting Hebrews 4:9-10 indicates just such a rest.

[1] Lincoln, “Sabbath, Rest, and Eschatology in the New Testament,” 213.

[2] Martin, The Christian Sabbath, 251-52.

[3] See Lincoln, “Sabbath, Rest, and Eschatology in the New Testament,” 213, where he admits this.

[4] Pipa, The Lord’s Day, 117.


More snippets from this upcoming book:

Jesus and the Sabbath – Matthew 12:1-14:

Just as the temple yields to Christ and is transformed to fit the redemptive-historical circumstances brought in by his sufferings and glory, so the Sabbath yields to Christ and is transformed to fit the same redemptive-historical circumstances. The inaugurated new covenant has both a temple and a Sabbath. This connects Christ’s teaching on the temple and the Sabbath with subsequent revelation.

Symbols, Types, Vos, and the Sabbath:

It is necessary to distinguish between symbols and types.[1] A symbol portrays a fact or reality that presently exists. A type is prospective. Perhaps Geerhardus Vos’ discussion of the fourth commandment can help at this juncture.[2] In his Biblical Theology the fourth commandment gets much more comment from Vos than the others.[3] One of the reasons is due to its origin and modified applicability throughout redemptive history.

New Book [Update]: “The Christian Sabbath: Its Redemptive-Historical Foundation, Present Obligation, & Practical Observance” by Dr. Robert Paul Martin

Looks like this new book, that we first mentioned here, is now being published by Reformation Heritage Books:

christian sabbath

The Christian Sabbath:
Its Redemptive-Historical Foundation, Present Obligation, and Practical Observance

by Dr. Robert Paul Martin 

“Everyone who loves the Scriptures yet has questions about whether we should keep the Fourth Commandment today should read this book.”

Joel R. Beeke, President, Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Summary:

Christian history has shown that in each generation the issue of the role of God’s law in the Christian life always resolves itself into a critical question, especially for those who wish to affirm the integrity and on-going authority of the Ten Commandments as a God-given ethical norm for Christian behavior. The question: what about the fourth commandment? Most believers have no doubt concerning the other nine commandments of the Decalogue. But under the terms of the New Covenant, does God require his people to keep holy a Sabbath day? This question never proves simple, but the answer given in some cases defines a group of Christians as much as their answers on other disputed points, such as church order, baptism, or spiritual gifts. Here is an honest attempt to answer this question biblically.

Author:

even-smaller-robert-martinRobert Paul Martin served for many years as Dean and Professor of Biblical Theology in Trinity Ministerial Academy, Montville, New Jersey. Subsequently he served for twenty years as pastor of Emmanuel Reformed Baptist Church, Seattle, Washington and continues to serve as Professor of Biblical Theology in Reformed Baptist Seminary, Taylors, South Carolina. Dr Martin and his wife Colleen have three children, Andrew, Iain-Josiah, and Lydia, and live in Renton, Washington.

Details:

Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Trinity Pulpit Press; 1 edition (February 16, 2016)

Endorsements:

“An exegetical, theological, historical, ethical, polemical, and practical masterpiece that made me worshipfully exclaim, “Oh, how I love your law! It is my meditation all the day.” This book has the potential to transform a seventh of your life from a legalistic drudge, or a dry duty, to an immeasurable delight.”

– Dr. David Murray, Pastor and Professor of Old Testament and Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary

“In an age where the Fourth Commandment appears to have been completely forgotten, a comprehensive and careful study of the Sabbath issue is welcome. This is a classic treatment deserving careful and sustained consideration by an equally careful scholar-preacher.”

– Derek W.H. Thomas, Robert Strong Professor of Systematic and Pastoral Theology, RTS Atlanta

“The Christian Sabbath is one of the greatest blessings that the risen Christ gave to his church. Yet for many, the assertion that there is a Christian Sabbath is a foreign concept. Robert Martin presents the grounds of Sabbath-keeping in light of its place in redemptive-history, culminating in theological and practical conclusions regarding how we should observe it today. This makes his book a useful blend of biblical, exegetical, and practical theology that aims to recover a vital aspect of the Christian life.”

– Ryan M. McGraw, Pastor of First OPC, Sunnyvale, CA

New Book: “The Christian Sabbath: Its Redemptive-Historical Foundation, Present Obligation, & Practical Observance” by Robert Martin

The Christian Sabbath Book

The Christian Sabbath:
Its Redemptive-Historical Foundation, Present Obligation, and Practical Observance

by Dr. Robert Paul Martin 

Summary:

Christian history has shown that in each generation the issue of the role of God’s law in the Christian life always resolves itself into a critical question, especially for those who wish to affirm the integrity and on-going authority of the Ten Commandments as a God-given ethical norm for Christian behavior. The question: what about the fourth commandment? Most believers have no doubt concerning the other nine commandments of the Decalogue. But under the terms of the New Covenant, does God require his people to keep holy a Sabbath day? This question never proves simple, but the answer given in some cases defines a group of Christians as much as their answers on other disputed points, such as church order, baptism, or spiritual gifts. Here is an honest attempt to answer this question biblically.

Author:

even-smaller-robert-martinRobert Paul Martin served for many years as Dean and Professor of Biblical Theology in Trinity Ministerial Academy, Montville, New Jersey. Subsequently he served for twenty years as pastor of Emmanuel Reformed Baptist Church, Seattle, Washington and continues to serve as Professor of Biblical Theology in Reformed Baptist Seminary, Taylors, South Carolina. Dr Martin and his wife Colleen have three children, Andrew, Iain-Josiah, and Lydia, and live in Renton, Washington.

Details:

Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Trinity Pulpit Press; 1 edition (February 16, 2016)

Answering Some Objections to Sabbath Observance [Tom Hicks]

reject_sabbathPastor Tom Hicks over at Founders Ministries’ THE BLOG:

In a previous post, I briefly sketched the Bible’s doctrine of the Sabbath day. Like nearly every doctrine of the Christian faith, the doctrine of the Sabbath is controversial among some Christians today. In this post, I’ll try to answer some of the most common objections to Sabbath observance.

1. New Testament Passages. Those who say Christians are not obligated to observe the Sabbath day often point to four key New Testament passages to make their case: Romans 14:1-9, Galatians 4:10, Colossians 2:16, and Hebrews 4:3-10. Though I won’t provide extensive exegesis here, I’d like briefly to consider these one at a time…

2. The Sabbath was a Sign for Israel. Some point out the Sabbath was a sign of the nation of Israel (Ex 31:16-17; Ezek 20:12). They argue that since the Sabbath was a sign of Israel, and since the church is not Israel, the Sabbath is not for the church…

3. Arguments from Silence. Some argue against Sabbath keeping from the silence of the Bible…

Pastor Tom Hicks
Pastor Tom Hicks

4. The Sabbath has been Fulfilled by Christ. Many argue that the Sabbath day has been fulfilled by Christ’s coming, and therefore, we should no longer keep the Sabbath…

5. Every Day is a Day of Worship for the Believer. Some who say that Christ fulfilled the Sabbath argue that “Every day is a day of rest in Christ and worship for the believer.”…

6. The Church Fathers from Ignatius to Augustine Taught that the Sabbath was Abolished. This argument from church history says that the early church fathers explicitly taught that the Sabbath is abolished; therefore, the doctrine of a Christian Sabbath is an innovation that was unknown in the earliest days of the church. But there are some problems here…

Read “Answering Some Objections to Sabbath Observance”.


[If you are looking for some more extensive exegesis on these passages I suggest you check out this Sunday School series.]

Interview #88 – Going Beyond the 5 Points – Earl Blackburn & Rob Ventura [Audio Podcast] (1 of 2)

Going Beyond the Five Points

ConfessingBaptistPodcastLogo

Pastor Earl Blackburn
Pastor Earl Blackburn
Pastor Rob Ventura
Pastor Rob Ventura

“This book is by Reformed Baptists for Reformed Baptists.”

On episode 88 of our interview podcast we have Pastor Earl Blackburn and Pastor Rob Ventura back on  to tell us all about the new book “Going Beyond the Five Points: Pursuing a More Comprehensive Reformation”.

We first got to know Rob Ventura on episode #40 (he also joined us on episodes #64). We first got to know Pastor Earl Blackburn on episode #68.

TOPICS:

  • Why this book?
  • Why shouldn’t we just stop at the “Five Points of Calvinism” (T.U.L.I.P.)?
  • The importance of God’s law in the Christian’s life
  • Why the Regulative Principle of Worship matters
  • Why we shouldn’t be afraid to dive into Covenant Theology
  • + more

LISTEN:

Subscribe to the podcast in a RSS readeriTunesStitcherTuneIn or by Email.

LINKAGE:

TUNAGE:

A Debtor To Mercy Alone [feat. Sandra McCracken] by Indelible Grace Music


Listen to part two.

Barcellos’ lecture “New Covenant Theology & the Law of God” with PowerPoint + Q&A [AUDIO] from the Greenville Seminary Spring Theology Conf. + more

March 10-12, 2015 was “The Law of God in a Lawless Age” Greenville Seminary’s Spring Theology Conference which took place in Simpsonville, SC.

GPTS Conf Law 2015

(Recall that we discussed this with Dr. Pipa here and here, as well as featured this audio interview with Richard Barcellos on “Knowing The Truth” Radio regarding New Covenant Theology and the Law and this conference.)

Below is the audio from Richard Barcellos’ lecture “New Covenant Theology & The Law of God: Views, Critiques, Proposals” [64 min. mp3]:

Here is the PowerPoint he prepared for the lecture but note that “The lecture does not follow the PowerPoint presentation due to various unforeseen factors.”:

Dr Barcellos at #gpts2015

A photo posted by Mike Hutchinson (@hutch.ces) on

#gpts2015 conference attendees.

A photo posted by William Hill (@re4med) on

The Panel Discussion (Day 1) also featured Richard Barcellos with most of the questions directed towards him. Also on the panel was Jospeh Pipa and Tony Curto. Below is a timeline followed by the audio:

• 00:52 – 08:35  “In relation to the threefold division of the law, how should we understand the distinction of clean and unclean animals in Genesis 7 and what appears to be Levirate Marriage in Genesis 38?”

• 08:47 – 10:20 “Do you disagree with the Marrow Men and Fisher when they say that the substance of the Covenant of Works was Moral Law?”

• 10:44 – 13:45 “Did John Bunyan hold the Mosaic Covenant to be a republication of the Covenant of Works for eternal life?”

• 13:50 – 17:38  “Can you explain New Covenant [Theology’s] interpretation of Jeremiah 31:31ff and offer a critique?”

• 14:47 – 22:33 “Can you make a few comments about the use of the law to bring a Christian to Christ in the context of counseling…”

• 22:38 – 24:34 “What is the best and most succinct way to defend  Sabbath keeping for those who claim that since it is not a command repeated in the New Testament it is not applicable to Christians.”

• 24:43 – 28:28 “What key passages from the Apostolic practice of evangelism among the Gentiles demonstrate the Law’s role in Gospel work.”

• 28:36 – 31:48 “Given the denial of the three-fold division of the law by New Covenant Theology advocates what Biblical principles govern their understanding of the day of worship?”

• 31:56 – 42:00 “Would you open up more practically how one might open up the law… in terms of evangelism.”

Audio [mp3]:

You can find the rest of the conference audio [RSS] below:

Blessed Weekly Remembrances [Jim Savastio]

Pastor Jim Savastio
Pastor Jim Savastio

Pastor Jim Savastio:

I am writing this during what the church calendar calls Holy Week. That means that this Sunday is Easter. It is the day that the Church, by and large, remembers the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. If you were to visit our church this Lord’s Day you would find us singing some songs celebrating the triumph of Jesus from the dead and, no doubt, one of our pastors (I’ll be on vacation) preaching a message related to this triumph. In most regards, however, our service this Lord’s Day will be no different from any of the other 51 Lord’s Days of the year. In fact, we will make very little of this particular Easter Sunday because we see every Lord’s Day in this way. That is, every single Lord’s Day is equally a reminder of the risen Jesus. Our church believes that the Lord’s Day is not only a weekly celebration of the resurrection (and the descent of the Spirit), but that it is rooted in the fourth commandment as well (that command calls us to ‘remember’ the day and why we are to remember it). Therefore the weekly coming of the first day of the week is a blessed remembrance to us of several things.

sunday

Every week I am reminded that I have a Creator.

The Sabbath is rooted in the facts of Creation.

Every week I am reminded that I have a Lawgiver.

The Sabbath, though a great gift to man, is a moral obligation of the King of Creation.

Every week I am reminded of the weakness of my flesh.

The coming of the New Covenant did not rewrite the DNA of our humanity. We are weak creatures who need (and apparently who need to be told) to take a weekly rest.

Just as I am reminded of my rest in Jesus so I am reminded of the need for my body to rest from my labors.

Every week I am reminded that I am redeemed man.

Why do I delight to take a day to be in God’s house and among God’s people and to refresh myself in rest, worship, service, reflection, and fellowship? One reason: Jesus laid hold of me and changed my heart.

Every week I am reminded that I am part of a community.

I love the gathering of God’s people. I am glad when it is said, Let US go into the house of the Lord.

Every week I am reminded of the fading nature of this world and the incomparable glory of the world to come.

I need time away from the world and the things of the world (even those innocent, acceptable and necessary things) so that they do not constantly grip my heart and my attention. Not only can I do without them, one day I will forever do without them.

I am reminded every week of the promise of a better, eternal Sabbath rest for the people of God.

Every week I am reminded of the reality of the Holy Spirit in the life of the church and the beauty of what the church is.

It was on the first day of the week that the Spirit came with power on the day of Pentecost.

I am reminded every single week that Jesus rose from the dead. This is why the church has gathered every single Sunday for two thousand years. No event in human history is so celebrated. In a focused way when I make the decisions I do of what I will and won’t do, where I will and won’t go, what I will and won’t say, I am doing so not only under the shadow of the cross, but from the glorious light of the empty tomb.

The Sabbath & the Conscience [5-Part Blog Series by Tom Chantry]

Pastor Tom Chantry
Pastor Tom Chantry

Pastor Tom Chantry:

I wrote a post about the Sabbath and the conscience. It was long, so – being “that kind of Puritan” – I made it longer. Then I broke it up into a series. Now we have five small installments, none of which should be too much for a day’s musing on the subject…

My intent this week is not to thoroughly examine the doctrine and practice of Sabbath, nor to defend the same. I have no intention of answering every random question anyone ever wanted to pose to a Sabbatarian. Instead we will be very tightly focused on the questions of conscience: is the Sabbath command “written on the heart” as Paul describes the conscience, and to the degree that it is not, what does that tell us?

Part 1: The Reformed view of the moral law

The confessional position, then, may be summarized in a few points:

  1. There is a universal and moral law, rooted in the character of God Himself, and applicable to all men at all times.
  2. That law was first given to Adam, instilled in him through conscience, and remains on the conscience of every one of his descendants, even if the conscience is muted by sin and may be repressed through consistent transgression.
  3. The same moral principles have been applicable at every point in history, and have been written in the Scriptures at various places. The moral law is summarized briefly in the two “Great Commandments” cited by Christ, and is summarized at greater length in the Ten Commandments.
  4. One evidence of this universal morality is that all men everywhere know the same basic moral code, regardless of whether or not they have even encountered the Bible.

 

4thcommand sabbathPart 2: The challenge to this theology in the current context

One critique of the Sabbath plays a large role in the thinking of many. It is the argument that Sabbath constitutes an exception to Paul’s conscience proof. “All right,” says the antinomian, “You want to say that the law written on men’s hearts is moral. That is true of the other Commandments, but the Fourth? We have a whole society which does not practice Sabbath, and no one feels pangs of conscience about it! How do you explain this if the moral law is written on everyone’s heart?


 

Part 3: The initial three steps, having to do with the problem of identifying moral law from general revelation

  1. Understand that the argument is formulated backwards
  2. The question fails to account for the power of depravity
  3. One wonders exactly how many commandments the antinomian is willing to abandon

 

Part 4: The last three steps, in which we ask whether or not it is even true that the Sabbath is entirely absent from our conscience

  1. If your awareness of Christian practice goes back more than one generation, you’ll have to admit that the Sabbath once pricked the conscience of men
  2. Don’t be so certain that the Sabbath isn’t written on every Christian’s heart – even today
  3. In fact, ours has increasingly become a culture of morally-enforced Sabbaths

 

rest-work-after-millet-1890.jpg!BlogPart 5: Conclusion

God’s law – properly observed – is always going to be better than the pale imitations our hearts devise when we suppress the conscience and ignore His commandments.

 

‘John Owen & New Covenant Theology’ appendix from ‘Covenant Theology: From Adam to Christ’ now online [HTML | PDF] by Richard Barcellos

Covenant Theology From Adam to ChristOne of the appendices from the book “Covenant Theology: From Adam to Christ” [from RBAP] is now available to read online (though we have featured it before on our NCT page, it is now available in HTML and an easier to read PDF).

It is the appendix by Richard Barcellos, “John Owen and New Covenant Theology: Owen on the Old and New Covenants and the Functions of the Decalogue in Redemptive History in Historical and Contemporary Perspective.”

If one reads some of the difficult sections of Owen’s writings, either without understanding his comprehensive thought and in light of the theological world in which he wrote, or in a superficial manner, some statements can easily be taken to mean things they do not. When this is done, the result is that authors are misunderstood and sometimes, subsequent theological movements are aligned with major historical figures without substantial and objective warrant. Two such instances of this involve John Owen and New Covenant Theology (NCT).

John G Reisinger
John G Reisinger

John G. Reisinger claims that Owen viewed the Old Covenant as “a legal/works covenant.” He goes on and says:

“This covenant was conditional because it was a legal/works covenant that promised life and threatened death. Israel failed to earn the blessings promised in the covenant. But under the New Covenant, the Church becomes the Israel of God and all her members are kings and priests (a kingdom of priests). Christ, as our Surety (Heb. 7:22), has kept the Old Covenant for us and earned every blessing it promised.”

The reader of Owen’s treatise on the Old and New Covenants in his Hebrews commentary, however, will quickly realize that Reisinger’s comments above do not give the full picture of Owen’s position…

Tom Wells is one of the authors of the 2002 book New Covenant Theology
Tom Wells is one of the authors of the 2002 book New Covenant Theology

Another NCT advocate, Tom Wells, claims that John G. Reisinger “has adopted John Owen’s view of the Mosaic and New covenants, without adding Owen’s ‘creation ordinance’ view of the Sabbath.”14 Wells also claims that Owen held a mediating position on the relationship between the Mosaic and New Covenants and that Owen’s position is substantially that of Reisinger and hence, NCT…

Read the rest online [HTML] or in PDF format:

Download (PDF, 655KB)

11 Reasons to Go to Church Every Sunday [Burks]

church pew header ecclesiologyJ. Brandon Burks:

  1. New creations love other new creations

  2. The Holy Spirit builds community

  3. We’re commanded to attend church

  4. We need the means of grace

  5. Perseverance of the Saints is a communal project

  6. We need to be under pastoral care

  7. We must contribute our time and money to the body of Christ

  8. If it is okay for you not to attend church, then it is okay for no one to attend

  9. The Sabbath Day is part of God’s moral law

  10. Loving Christ means loving His bride

  11. The Church has a mission that involves all of Christ’s sheep

Read the explanation of each point.

New “Reformed Baptist Trumpet” e-journal [PDF] Vol.5 No.2 Apr.-Jun. 2014

The latest edition of the Reformed Baptist Trumpet, the e-journal of the Reformed Baptist Fellowship of Virginia, is out!

Reformed Baptist Trumpet2

In this issue:

–  Info on the 2014 Keach Conference which will be held Friday PM-Saturday AM, September 26-27, 2014. Speakers: Jim Savastio and Earl Blackburn. [details]

 

– Article by W. Gary Crampton: Reformed Theology and the Sabbath.

 

– Review of Tom Chantry and David Dykstra’s Holding Communion Together by Jeffrey T. Riddle.

 

– Paradosis article: Excerpt from Benjamin Keach’s 1693 sermon “The Blessedness of Christ’s Sheep.”

PDF:

Download (PDF, Unknown)

Reformed Baptist TrumpetThe Reformed Baptist Trumpet is the quarterly e-journal of the Reformed Baptist Fellowship of  Virginia (RBF-VA), a network of ministers, church officers, and congregations in Virginia committed to promoting renewal and reformation in congregations throughout the Commonwealth and beyond. The RBF-VA gladly affirms the Second London Baptist Confession of Faith of 1689. The Reformed Baptist Trumpet editorial committee: Steve Clevenger, Pastor, Covenant Reformed Baptist Church, Warrenton, Virginia; Jeffrey T. Riddle, Pastor, Christ Reformed Baptist Church, Charlottesville, Virginia; W. Gary Crampton, Elder, Reformed Baptist Church, Richmond, Virginia. The Editor is Jeffrey T. Riddle.

Some thoughts on Jesus’ statement that He is Lord of the Sabbath [Barcellos]

sabbathRichard Barcellos:

What the Lord is affirming is that the Sabbath has its place within the sphere of his messianic lordship and that he exercises lordship over the Sabbath because the Sabbath was made for man. Since he is Lord of the Sabbath it is his to guard it against those distortions and perversions with which Pharisaism had surrounded it and by which its truly beneficent purpose has been defeated. But he is also its Lord to guard and vindicate its permanent place within that messianic lordship which he exercises over all things–he is Lord of the Sabbath, too. And he is Lord of it, not for the purpose of depriving men of that inestimable benefit which the Sabbath bestows, but for the purpose of bringing to the fullest realization on behalf of men that beneficent design for which the Sabbath was instituted. If the Sabbath was made for man, and if Jesus is the Son of man to save man, surely the lordship which he exercises to that end is not to deprive man of that which was made for his good, but to seal to man that which the Sabbath institution involves. Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath–we dare not tamper with his authority and we dare not misconstrue the intent of his words.

Read “some thoughts on Mark 2 and the Sabbath [9 min. readout]

of New Covenant Theology [Resource Roundup]

This is meant to be a replacement of the soon to cease Credopedia page on New Covenant Theology. Note that dead links were removed or replaced with “living” ones:

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VIDEOS:

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via 1689federalism.com

Discover how the covenant theology of the 2nd London Baptist Confession compares to New Covenant Theology and Progressive Dispensationalism.

Charts from the above video and site:

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black & white version for printing

Dr. Sam Waldron and Dr. Richard Barcellos discuss (on video)  Tom Wells’ book, “The Christian and The Sabbath”:

Please read Dr. Barcellos’ comments on the MCTS Blog.

“There are some who choose to confess the 1646 London Baptist confession rather than the 1677 London Baptist confession. Their reasons for this choice vary, but among them are those who wish to adhere to what is known as ‘New Covenant Theology.’ In making this move, it is claimed, they are identifying with Baptists who did not hold such a ‘rigid’ stance on the law as it is expressed in the 1677 London Baptist confession. However, when examined in its historical context, there is no difference between the views of the early and later baptists concerning the law.”

Sam Renihan

With that said, see Dr. James Renihan’s exposition of the entire 1st LBC 1644/1646 [3 Videos]:

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Intro, Outline, and Unit 1 of the Confession (paragraphs 1 through 6) [49 min. video]:

Units 2, 3, and 4 of the Confession (paragraphs 7 through 32) [75 min. video]:

Units 5 and 6 of the Confession (paragraphs 33 through 53) [67 min. video]:

AUDIO:

2005-Sep-23: Jim Renihan, New Covenant Theology

2006-Oct-07: Sam Waldron, The Law and New Covenant Theology

2010-Feb-17: Richard Barcellos, Through New Eyes Interview (Part 1)

2010-Mar-18: Richard Barcellos, Through New Eyes Interview (Part 2) [PDF Transcript]

ARTICLES:

BOOKS:

In Defense of the Decalogue : A Critique of New Covenant Theology [Paperback] Richard Barcellos
In Defense of the Decalogue: A Critique of New Covenant Theology [Paperback]
by Richard C. Barcellos

The Family Tree of Reformed Biblical Theology: Geerhardus Vos and John Owen, Their Methods of and Contributions to the Articulation of Redemptive History [Paperback] by Richard C Barcellos
The Family Tree of Reformed Biblical Theology: Geerhardus Vos and John Owen, Their Methods of and Contributions to the Articulation of Redemptive History [Paperback | Amazon]
by Richard C Barcellos

(see especially Appendix 2: John Owen and Reformed Orthodoxy on the Functions of the Decalogue in Redemptive History)

Excerpt: The Temporal Revelation of the Covenant of Works in Owen – Absolutely or Relatively Coeval with Creation?

A Reformed Baptist Manifesto: The New Covenant Constitution of the Church
A Reformed Baptist Manifesto: The New Covenant Constitution of the Church [Paperback | Amazon]
by Samuel E. Waldron & Richard C. Barcellos

 (see especially Chapter 2: “The New Covenant Constitution of the Church and Antinomianism” and Appendix 2: “Book Review of ‘New Covenant Theology’”)

Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies, 2014
Journal of the Institute of Reformed Baptist Studies, 2014 [Paperback | Amazon]

(see especially “Kingdom through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants, A Review Article by Samuel Renihan” [sample])

Upcoming: Recovering a Covenantal Heritage: Essays in Baptist Covenant Theology
Upcoming: Recovering a Covenantal Heritage: Essays in Baptist Covenant Theology

Excerpt: Conclusion of Chapter 2 Covenant Theology in the First and Second London Baptist Confessions by James M. Renihan

Excerpt: Conclusion to Chapter 1 of Recovering a Covenantal Heritage: Essays in Baptist Covenant Theology by Richard C. Barcellos

all our post on “New Covenant Theology”

Any we missed?

Anticipation: What about post-Easter Sunday? [Jeremy Walker]

JEREMY Walker
Pastor Jeremy Walker

 

What about the Sunday after last? Jeremy Walker on the passing of Easter/Resurrection Sunday/April 20…

Last weekend brought with it all the brouhaha that seems to be the sadly-increasing norm among evangelicals with regard to ‘holy week’ and Easter Sunday…

And so the brouhaha dies down, at least until next year. After all, this next one is just an ordinary Sunday, isn’t it?

If that is your attitude, might I suggest that your view of the Lord’s day is sadly deficient and probably damaging. I hope you would not need to be a full-orbed sabbatarian to recognise the significance of the first day of the week, the day on which the Lord Jesus rose from the dead, the day on which he met again and again with his disciples, making himself known to them and impressing upon them the realities of his resurrection.

Read the rest here: Anticipation – Reformation21 Blog.