Voddie Baucham & James White answer questions regarding homosexuality & abortion + more [5 short Wretched TV clips]

Baucham and White
Voddie Baucham & James White

Wretched TV – with Todd Friel” has featured some clips from their daily update archive, over the past several weeks, featuring Voddie Baucham and James White.

Below are the clips with timeline:

James White’s scary 5 year prediction for the church [7 min. vid.]:

  • 0:00 – 2:10 “Where do you see the church, with its relationship to the government in five years regarding the issue on homosexuality?”
  • 2:11 – 4:20 “[W]here do you see the relationship of Christianity, specifically the local church now, in ten years with the state?”
  • 4:21 – 6:27 “Is there anything that the Evangelical Christian who is hearing this can do?”


Three types of homosexuals??? [4 min. vid.]:

  • 0:00 – 0:29 “Would you stand on a platform with… a Mormon, with a Rabbi, with a Imam to talk about the importance of coming together on the life issue or the marriage issue?”
  • 0:30 – 4:03  “There are three types of homosexuals…  [the first two groups] are not the enemy… and they are actually the harvest field therefore I show them love?”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3w63rN5Jsc


Voddie Baucham and Scott Kluesendorf: Should Christians be incrementalists re. abortion? [5 min. vid.]:

  • 0:00 – 1:34 What would Voddie say to the person who insist “No incrementalism, it’s everything or nothing!”?
  • 1:35 – 3:20 “What do you say then to the person who responds, “Incrementalism? We don’t do that with other forms of murder. We don’t do that with rape. ‘Hey, we’re against rape BUT we’ll take this piece of legislation that doesn’t completely outlaw it…'”?
    • 3:28 – 4:56 Scott Kluesendorf continues to answer the above


Voddie Baucham and Scott Kluesendorf: Should we publicly display pictures of aborted babies? [4 min. vid.]:

  • 0:27 – 1:24 Scott Kluesendorf answers
  • 1:25 –  2:37 Voddie Baucham answers


Voddie Baucham and James White: Should we call people who have had abortions “murderers?” [3 min. vid.]:

  • 0:35 – 2:02 James White answers
  • 2:20 – 3:46 Voddie Baucham answers

Q&A with James White on Theonomy, Gay Christians, Islam, Covenants, Baptism, Cults + more [AUDIO]

Last week (March 25, 2015) Dr. James White did a Q&A at Sovereign Grace Family Church.

Dr-White-SGFC

Although the event said he would be answering question on Islam and Christian Baptism the questions were much more varied.

Audio Timeline & Links:

Christopher Arnzen
Christopher Arnzen

• 00:00 – 03:54 Intro by Chris Arnzen (he fills us in that Iron Sharpens Iron will be relaunched in 3-4 weeks!)

• 03:55 – 10:16 James White’s opening words on focusing on Christ not any “celebrity” (here is the video he mentions “James White’s scary 5 year prediction for the church“)

• 10:17 – 18:51  “Do you believe Theonomy to be a heresy…?” (here is his “Holiness Code for Today” series that he mentions)

Justin Lee & James White Debate
Justin Lee & James White Debate

• 18:52 – 25:17 “How should we approach gays who call themselves Christians?” (here is the debate mentioned Debate: Can You Be Gay & Christian? – James White & Justin Lee)

• 25:18 – 29:00 “When a homosexual says, ‘We all have our pet sin’ how do you approach that?”

• 29:01 – 30:49 “While many Christians speak of it being a reality that same-sex attraction exist amongst truly born-again people, why is it that very few dare to say the same of some of the abominations recorded in the Scriptures such as bestiality and necrophilia?”

• 30:50 – 34:47 “What part, if any, do you believe that Islam plays in the end times?”

• 34:48 – 41:31 “If you agree that the Abrahamic Covenant is a covenant of promise to believers and their children and is an eternal covenant, so how is the New Covenant any different?”

Steven Anderson & James White
Steven Anderson & James White

• 41:32 – 45:49 “In an interview with a King James Only guy you made the comment about Paul quoting an Old Testament variant… would you please comment on how that would affect the Word of God being perfect.” (here is the interview that was being discussed with Steve Anderson)

• 45:50 – 51:38 “How great of a danger do you see presented by the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ as compared to other religious or spiritual movements?”

TrinityShield_300• 51:39 – 55:22 “How or should we condemn Unitarianism and Modalism as damnable heresy even if it maintains a view of Christ’s deity when at the same time many Christian apologist recognize that the majority of Evangelicals in the pew could not Biblically define the Trinity without slipping into a Modalist [or Unitarian] example.”

• 55:45 – 64:00 “How would you teach the best way to approach a Muslim with the Gospel? …”

Audio:

65 Minute Audio [MP3]:

What’s a Reformed Baptist? Can there be such a thing? Tom Chantry answers

capitol reformed baptist churchTom Chantry:

Before we can answer whether Reformed Baptists exist, we must first identify what that designation means. “Reformed Baptist” is a term – albeit a compound term – with a definition and a history. Understanding that history is necessary if anyone is going to understand what the first word in the term means. While a number of useful brief definitions exist, I intend to address the question from the standpoint of history.

Read “Defining ‘Reformed Baptist’ (again)”

What is the Relationship of Anabaptists to Baptists? [Ask A Reformed Baptist]

Drowning of [Anabaptist] Maria von Monjou, 1552.
Drowning of [Anabaptist] Maria von Monjou, 1552.
A common question that comes up is, “What is the relationship of Anabaptists to Baptists?”

Paedobaptists will tell you Baptists are Anabaptists. and it doesn’t help  that some Arminian Dispensational (SBC) Baptists will trace their roots to Anabaptists.

On a surface-level view it would be easy to think they are one and the same – but a simple look at history and doctrine reveals otherwise.

Phil Johnson
Phil Johnson

From Phil Johnson’s, “The Anabaptists“:

Many Anabaptist ideas made invaluable contributions to the Reformation. For example, these five tenets might be identified as Anabaptist distinctives:

Sola Scriptura—Anabaptists were sometimes more consistent than the Magisterial Reformers in their insistence on biblical authority for certain practices in matters of church polity and worship.

Separation of Church and State—Anabaptists correctly saw the church as the assembly of the redeemed, antithetical to the world and sometimes antagonistic to society as a whole. For this reason they advocated separation of church and state.

Freedom of Conscience—because of the Anabaptists’ convictions about the role of the secular state, they believed that the ultimate remedy for heresy was excommunication. They steadfastly opposed the persecution that was so characteristic of their age. They denied that the state had a right to punish or execute anyone for religious beliefs or teachings. This was a revolutionary notion in the Reformation era.

Believers’ Baptism—The anabaptists were the among the first to point out the lack of explicit biblical support for infant baptism. Most of them made no issue of the mode of baptism, and practiced affusion (sprinkling), however, so they were not true baptists in the modern sense of the word.

Holiness of Life—Anabaptists gave much emphasis to spiritual experience, practical righteousness, and obedience to divine standards. They had no tolerance for those who claimed to be justified by faith while living unfaithful lives. Anabaptists pointed out that Scripture says, “Faith without works is dead” (Jas. 2:20).

On most of those points we would strongly agree with the Anabaptists’ thrust (though not necessarily with the extreme conclusions they sometimes came to).

Nevertheless, there is very good reason to approach the Anabaptist movement with a healthy dose of caution. While acknowledging our very real debt to the Anabaptists on the matters enumerated above, we must also recognize an unhealthy tendency in Anabaptist doctrine: Anabaptists rejected the Reformed understanding of justification by faith alone. They denied the forensic nature of justification and insisted that the only ground on which sinners can be acceptable to God is a “real” righteousness wrought within the justified person.

For further reading on Anabaptist theology see the recommended resources (links) on Phil Johnson’s site.

Also at Phil Johnson’s Spurgeon.org is Chris Traffanstedt’s piece, “A Primer on Baptist History: The True Baptist Trail“:

Burning of [Anabaptist] Anneken Hendriks, Amsterdam, 1571.
Burning of [Anabaptist] Anneken Hendriks, Amsterdam, 1571.
Anabaptist Influence

Most Baptists are fooled into thinking that we come from the Anabaptists just because the word “baptist” is found in their name. But we must use great caution here. We must explore who the Anabaptists really were and ask the all-important question: Are they truly representative of Baptist beliefs?Who are these people called “Anabaptist”? This group refers to a community of rebels during the Reformation period; they were considered to be the radical wing of the Reformation. Even within this group there were various views and camps. Two main separate camps can be identified: the “revolutionary Anabaptist” and the “evangelical Anabaptist.”[11] We really do not want to spend too much time on the revolutionary group for they hardly reflect a biblical approach to Christianity. They actually took on the form of a cult, holding to an extreme mystical experiential view and believing their leaders to be prophets (future-tellers). They were also quick to use violence to get their way.However, the “evangelical” Anabaptists were a movement of a different type. And it is from this group that many say the Baptist movement was born. Thus, we need to take some time to examine them. This group, first of all, rejected the orthodox Christian view of sin. Instead of holding to sin as a bondage both of the nature and actions of mankind, they held that sin was “a loss of capacity or a serious sickness.”[12] The Anabaptists, in following Rome’s view of justification, held that God makes us righteous and then accepts us on the basis of our righteousness. They also believed that Christ did not take His flesh from Mary but held to a heavenly origin for His flesh. When it came to the world, the Anabaptists believe we were to totally separate ourselves from it (although they did dip into it with a zealous evangelism on occasion). The Anabaptists rejected infant baptism and held to believer’s baptism, but their mode for the most part was sprinkling, not pouring or immersion. Their view of interpreting Scripture was that of just strict imitation which led to large movements of legalism.[13]When we look at the Anabaptists we must agree that there are some similarities with the early General Baptists, but overall these similarities are slight and not always relational. In the end, we must come to say that this group of Christians does not reflect the historical teaching of the Baptists. The large portion of Baptist history shows us that Baptists held to a strong position on sin, both in our nature and in our actions, not as just some mere sickness. Baptists have also held to a belief in the virgin birth and see that this is what points to the doctrine of the God-Man, not just some heavenly illusion. As well, Baptists have held strongly to the Reformation’s recovery of justification – that it is based upon Christ’s righteousness alone and not our righteousness because we have none. And finally, Baptists have always seen that the Scriptures are to be studied and applied to everyday life through the power of the Holy Spirit and are not to be followed just in blind imitation or by a leap of faith. So we must clearly reject, as history does, that the Baptist origins flow from the Anabaptists.

The fact of history is that three “Believer’s-Only” groups arose independently of each other and with a few similarities, but even more dissimilarities. The Continental Anabaptists (who did not immerse), the English General Baptists, and the English Particular Baptists.

1644, The First (Particular Baptist) London Confession of Faith

The Confession of Faith, Of those Churches which are commonly (though falsly ) called Anabaptists;

[ see also “Were the Particular Baptists Anabaptists? Paedobaptists Answer”]

1644 anabaptist

1660, The (General Baptist) Standard Confession

A Brief Confession Or Declaration Of Faith. Set forth by many of us, who are (falsely) called Ana-baptists…

For more on Particular Baptist History, read and listen to:

Baptist Symbolics Header 1689CONFESSING THE FAITH IN 1644 AND 1689
Dr. James M. Renihan

PodcastPromo007The Confessing Baptist Interview with Dr. James Renihan on Particular Baptist History

Dr. James Renihan BowtieThe Reformation and the Baptist [AUDIO]
Dr. James M. Renihan

Haykin PinkWhere Did Baptists Come From? [AUDIO]
Dr. Michael A. G. Haykin

So if Baptists are not the heirs to the Anabaptists, who are? The Amish, The Brethren, and the Mennonites.

In 2006 the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and in 2008 the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) apologized for the Lutheran persecution of Anabaptists. To whom did they apologize? SBC, or any Baptist group? No. They apologized to Mennonites. (see ELCA and LWF)

Lyn & Erroll Hulse
Lyn & Erroll Hulse

I’ll end with a quote from Erroll Hulse,

As Professors James McGoldrick [Baptist Successionism: A Crucial Question in Baptist History] and Michael Haykin [Kiffin, Knollys, & Keach: Rediscovering English Baptist Heritage] have shown, historical evidence is lacking to prove a connection between the Continental Anabaptists of the sixteenth century and the English Baptists.

Hulse, Erroll. Who Are the Puritans?: And What Do They Teach? Darlington (England): Evangelical Press, 2000. Print. Page 188.

Advice to Young Pastors [Conrad Mbewe & Ken Jones]

The Gospel Coalition ask:

In addition to Scripture and sound doctrine, what should young pastors today be studying? Is that any different from what you would’ve recommended 20 years ago, or even 10 years ago?

Conrad Mbewe
Conrad Mbewe

Conrad Mbewe answers:

I would urge pastors to study one vital area (other than the Scriptures and sound doctrine). That would be church history, with emphasis on Christian biography. I find that this practice answers a number of needs. First, as a pastor you learn from others who have gone before you on how to maintain personal godliness and domestic competence in the heat of a growing and demanding ministry. Second, you learn from others how to remain faithful to your calling in the long haul, despite the weariness of the fight of faith you must maintain. Third, reading biographies gives you a wider perspective of what you’re called to do. This could relate to the current stage in the spread of the gospel and thus help you put emphasis in the right place. The wider perspective can also make you consider your own mortality. Most biographies are on men and women who have gone to their reward and have left us their legacy. It begs the question: What kind of legacy do I wish to leave behind?

Ken Jones
Ken Jones

Ken Jones answers:

There are two directions that I’m inclined to take. The first is Christ-centered preaching/metanarrative. Greg Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology in conjunction with works like Sidney Greidanus’s Preaching Christ from the Old Testament and Dennis Johnson’s Him We Proclaim capture the sense in which I combine these two distinct areas of theological study. Much evangelical preaching tends to be either therapeutic or moralistic, regardless of theological persuasion. A firmer grasp on Scripture’s particular underlying and overarching message—centered on the person and work of Jesus—would change the substance of what’s being preached. I see that more clearly now than I did 20 years ago. The second direction is toward material that outlines different models for Christians engaging culture. In Reformed circles we talk about Abraham Kuyper or two kingdoms as expressing what it means to be salt and light; unfortunately the differences between the camps are so fiercely debated that the substance of the positions are often lost. Granted, much of our understanding of how the church engages culture is grounded in one’s ecclesiology, but a more thorough understanding of the prevailing positions would be useful, especially in light of the cultural and social issues of the day.

Doesn’t God’s relationship with particular people change as a result of Christ’s work on the cross? D. Scott Meadows answers [Herald of Grace Mag]

I’m fine-tuning [re-programming] the Bapti-Bots now because somehow they missed reporting a site to us. The site is called “Herald of Grace” which is “An online Christian magazine, heralding God’s saving truth (2 Tim. 4:2)”. Contributors include Pastor David Chanski, Dr. Alan J. Dunn, Albert N. Martin, Pastor D. Scott Meadows, Pastor John Reuther, Pastor Noble Vater + more.

Below is a snippet of the first featured article from their site (mag):

Pastor D. Scott Meadows
Pastor D. Scott Meadows

D. Scott Meadows:

God loves His chosen people eternally—not just everlastingly, if by everlastingly we mean from a certain point in time and enduringly through a succession of moments without end. Rather, His sovereign love upon particular individuals whom He purposes to create and to save has no beginning and no end. “God is love” (1 John 4.8, 16). His love is not something added to Him, not even a long, long time ago. It is timeless and eternal. It “was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began,” before “the beginning” (Gen 1.1), that is, before time, if we may so speak. It is this love that accounts for the Christian’s holy call in his or her life experience to return to God. That call to salvation is “not according to our works,” which are all sinful and unworthy, “but according to His own purpose and grace,” the outworking of His eternal decree, and the exercise of His sovereign prerogative to be merciful and gracious to whomever He will, and to harden or blind the rest (Exod 33.19; Rom 9.15-16, 18; 11.7-8).

Objections to this biblical doctrine abound. Many may be dismissed easily, but some are more difficult. A thoughtful question is, “Doesn’t God’s relationship with particular people change as a result of Christ’s work on the cross?” or possibly, “when they believe the gospel?”…

Loved Before Time Meadows

Read “Loved Before Time”.

Any other sites you think the Bapti-Bots have missed?
Let us know.

Does God Want You Healed? The Covenant Legacy Webcast Answers

Covenant LegacyCovenant Legacy Webcast “Episode 5 – Round Table – Does God Want You Healed?”:

Eric and Nathan wrestle with the question, “Does God want you healed?” Some people say that it is always in God’s plan and desire to heal everyone in this life of sickness. Should we expect healing in every circumstance or does the Bible present a different message? This episode will examine four Biblical reasons for sickness, and show that even in affliction God is loving to his people.

29  minute mp3:

More discussion on this with Eric Ayala at the Reformed Baptist Fellowship & Theology Forum on Facebook.

How Can We Know If Our Children Are Christians? Tom Hicks Answers

Tom Hicks
Tom Hicks

Reformed Baptist Fellowship:

Christian parents want our children to know Christ because we want what is best for them. Many parents, however, struggle with how to know whether their children have come to a saving knowledge of Christ. While there’s no way to give a complete answer in a short blog post like this, I’ll try to offer you a handful of basic principles. No child gives evidence of salvation in a vacuum. These are things a child has to learn from faithful parents who teach him the Word of God. And these are lessons of the heart that only the Holy Spirit can truly teach. A child may certainly be saved before his parents can see it, but there are some evidences that point to our child’s salvation.

  1. Growing awareness of God’s goodness.
  2. Increasing sense of personal sin.
  3. Leaning on Jesus for forgiveness and salvation.
  4. Growing desire to know the Bible and pray.
  5. Faithful repentance of sin and increasing obedience to Christ’s commands.

Read the explanation of each point.

No child (or adult for that matter!) does any of these things perfectly. But if your child has a pattern of these evidences of salvation, you should bring him to the pastors of your church for baptism and church membership.

Does God Change in the Incarnation? Spurgeon Answers [Quote & Sermon Audio]

Pastor Erik Raymond points out a quote from Spurgeon that is, “especially helpful in considering the immutability of God (the fact that he does not change) even in light of the incarnation of Christ“:

Charles Spurgeon
Charles Spurgeon

All creatures change. Man, especially as to his body, is always undergoing revolution. Very probably there is not a single particle in my body which was in it a few years ago. This frame has been worn away by activity, its atoms have been removed by friction, fresh particles of matter have in the mean time constantly accrued to my body, and so it has been replenished; but its substance is altered.

The fabric of which this world is made is ever passing away; like a stream of water, drops are running away and others are following after, keeping the river still full, but always changing in its elements.

But God is perpetually the same. He is not composed of any substance or material, but is spirit—pure, essential, and ethereal spirit—and therefore he is immutable. He remains everlastingly the same. There are no furrows on his eternal brow. No age hath palsied him; no years have marked him with the mementoes of their flight; he sees ages pass, but with him it is ever now. He is the great I AM—the Great Unchangeable.

Mark you, his essence did not undergo a change when it became united with the manhood. When Christ in past years did gird himself with mortal clay, the essence of his divinity was not changed; flesh did not become God, nor did God become flesh by a real actual change of nature; the two were united in hypostatical union, but the Godhead was still the same. It was the same when he was a babe in the manger, as it was when he stretched the curtains of heaven; it was the same God that hung upon the cross, and whose blood flowed down in a purple river, the self-same God that holds the world upon his everlasting shoulders, and bears in his hands the keys of death and hell.

He never has been changed in his essence, not even by his incarnation; he remains everlastingly, eternally, the one unchanging God, the Father of lights, with whom there is no variableness, neither the shadow of a change.

Here is the entire sermon (his first preached at New Park Street Chapel, Southwark).

Read out [mp3]:

Was Adam a historical figure? Geoff Thomas answers [Audio]

Geoff ThomasGeoff Thomas:

Should we believe that Adam was a real historical figure, that he was the actual federal head of all mankind, the first man who fell into sin, who defied God’s prohibition not to eat the fruit of one tree? So let’s begin by examining this question.

adam-and-eve

Outline:

  1. How did the Apostle Paul consider Adam?
  2. There are other places where Adam is referred to.
  3. What if the beginning of Scripture is erroneous?
  4. Can we re-interpret Adam as a figure standing for ‘Everyman’?
  5. What about Lucy?
  6. What the historical Adam gives us.
    1. IT GIVES US TRUTH AT THE BEGINNING OF THE OLD TESTAMENT.
    2. THE HISTORICAL ADAM EXPLAINS WHY THE HUMAN RACE IS OFTEN IN THE SAD CONDITION IT IS IN.
    3. THE HISTORICAL ADAM AND EVE EXPLAIN TO US THE BIBLICAL POSITION ON THE DIFFERENT ROLES AND RELATIONSHIPS OF A HUSBAND AND A WIFE.
    4. THE HISTORIC ADAM PREPARES AND INTRODUCES US TO THE HISTORIC CHRIST.
    5. THE HISTORICAL ADAM HELPS US IN MISSION AND EVANGELISM.
    6. THE HISTORIC ADAM ENCOURAGES US TO HOPE IN OUR RESURRECTION BODIES.

Here is the sermon transcript and audio [50 min. mp3]:

Is the evangelical church really glorifying God? [Conrad Mbewe]

Conrad Mbewe
Conrad Mbewe

Conrad Mbewe asks 10 questions towards “evangelical Christianity in Africa”, but these same questions could/should be asked worldwide:

As 2014 draws to an end, my heart aches. I am deeply burdened about what has become the dominant characteristic of evangelical Christianity in Africa. I have tried to wrap my mind around this by simply asking an honest question “Is this Christianity that has become pervasive across the African continent really glorifying God?”

 

1. Are we glorifying God when we claim that we are experiencing miracles that are actually not happening? […]

 

2. Are we glorifying God when we speak in “tongues” that cannot be interpreted? […]

 

3. Are we glorifying God when we reduce the benefits of salvation to more wealth and better health? […]

 

4. Are we glorifying God when we abandon the preaching of repentance for motivational speaking? […]

 

5. Are we glorifying God when we hide the rot of spiritual wolves preying on vulnerable souls? […]

 

6. Are we glorifying God when we reduce truth to a minimum for the sake of Christian unity? […]

 

7. Are we glorifying God when we reduce worship to senseless dancing to sensual music? […]

 

8. Are we glorifying God when commanding, declaring and decreeing replace humble petitions in prayer? […]

 

9. Are we glorifying God when we fill our church membership rolls with goats and kick out church discipline? […]

 

10. Are we glorifying God when we have women preachers while men sit in pews and listen to them? […]

Read “Is the evangelical church in Africa really glorifying God?”

Of What Use Is The Law? Jeff Robinson Answers

Threefold-Use-of-Law_620“Of What Use is the Law? Three purposes”

by Jeff Robinson:

Recently, after our family had completed its daily devotional time together, my oldest son asked me a very insightful question: How do the Ten Commandments apply to us today if they were given so long ago in the Old Testament?

 

It is a basic theological question that many Christians have asked throughout the history of the church and it is an important query. Many answers have been given to that, not all of them good. Obviously, there are two answers that are dead wrong and lead to two opposite ditches that the follower of Christ must avoid: Antinomianism (the law of God has no place in the life of the believer and he/she is free to live however they please) and legalism (I am saved by how closely I adhere to God’s commands—works righteousness).

 

One of the best and most helpful answers, in my opinion, that has been given was set forth by the Genevan reformer, John Calvin. In his venerable systematic theology, the Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin set forth three “uses” for the moral law of God. {Book 2, Chapter 7, edj}

Institutes

 

Calvin’s is a helpful paradigm, I think. But perhaps best of all, Calvin reminded his readers, in speaking of the first use of the law, that the law—like a schoolmaster—prepares one to receive the good news of the gospel. The law of God demonstrates that man has no righteousness in himself that is pleasing to God. Sinful man must be given a righteousness that is extra nos—outside of himself. As the Puritans, Calvin’s theological ancestors, famously put it, the law wounds and then the gospel arrives and heals.

 

As followers of Christ, we are a people of grace and not law. But it is God’s law that demonstrates his spotless character and shows our need of grace. Calvin saw this clearly. As Paul admonished young Timothy, may God teach us how to use the law lawfully (1 Tim. 1:8).

For the full article please read, “Of What Use Is The Law? Three Purposes” by Jeff Robinson at The Blog: The Voice of Founders.org

{see also 2nd London Particular Baptist Confession of Faith, Chapter 19, Of The Law of God, edj}

Was Jesus married to His ‘co-Messiah,’ Mary Magdalene, with two children? Dr. James White answers [AUDIO]

srn_mefferd

Dr. James White
Dr. James White

Hour one of the Nov. 13, 2013 Janet Mefferd Radio Show:

How do we answer the ridiculous and blasphemous claims of a new book [The Lost Gospel, which will also be an upcoming documentary] that Jesus was married to His “co-Messiah,” Mary Magdalene, and He had two children? Dr. James White, director of Alpha and Omega Ministries, joins Janet to set the record straight.

Relevant audio starts at the 20 minute mark. [MP3]:

 

Are You Trying or Training for Godliness? [Jeffery Smith]

1 Tim 4 7-8 train godliness sanctification

Pastor Jeffery Smith
Pastor Jeffery Smith

Jeffery Smith:

There are many things that cannot be accomplished without training. You can try to do them but you won’t be able to do them if you’ve not been engaging in the discipline of training. For example, you may try to run a marathon but you won’t be able to, no matter how hard you try, if you haven’t been training for it. Spend six to twelve months training for it and you might be able to do it in a decent time. Running long distances requires the discipline of running on a fairly regular basis to build up your stamina. You may try to bench press 250 pounds but most men are not able to do that by simply walking into a gym one day and giving it a try. To get to the place where you can bench press 250 pounds normally requires the discipline of regular weight lifting to build up your strength. I may try to lose weight but, again, if I really want to lose weight and keep it off in the long term I must train to lose weight. I need to develop disciplines of exercise and proper eating.

Read “Are You Trying or Training for Godliness?”

 

Only the Father knows? Pastor John Samson answers

bible Matthew 24 36 only the Father knows

Matthew 24:36 says,

 

“But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father only.”

 

This seems to be problematic, for if there is something the Son does not know, would this not indicate to us that he is not omniscient (all knowing)? God is all knowing and yet this tells us that there is something Christ did not know. Pastor John, how do we reconcile this verse with the Christian concept of the Deity of Christ?

Read his answer.