AUDIO from the 2016 Keach Conf. “Of Effectual Calling” now online feat. Clevenger, McKinnon, Riddle, & Rice

2016 Keach speakers and worship leaders (left to right): Andy Rice, Bret Vincent, Steve Clevenger, Jeff Riddle, Lee McKinnon
2016 Keach speakers and worship leaders (left to right): Andy Rice, Bret Vincent, Steve Clevenger, Jeff Riddle, Lee McKinnon

Jeff Riddle:

The 2016 Keach Conference, sponsored by the Reformed Baptist Fellowship of Virginia, was held on Saturday, October 1, 2016 at the Providence Baptist Church in Harrisonburg, Virginia.  The theme was “Of Effectual Calling,” with four messages drawn from chapter ten of the Second London Baptist Confession (1689).

Audio:

Message One: Steve Clevenger, Covenant Reformed Baptist Church, Warrenton, Virginia: Effectual Calling and Regeneration. [mp3]:

Message Two: Lee McKinnon, Covenant Reformed Baptist Church, Bluefield, West Virginia: Effectual Calling and Spiritual Ability. [mp3]:

Message Three: Jeff Riddle, Christ Reformed Baptist Church, Louisa, Virginia: Effectual Calling and Elect Infants. [mp3]:

Message Four: Andy Rice, Providence Baptist Church, Harrisonburg, Virginia: Effectual Calling and the Reprobate. [mp3]:

Radio interview w/ Michael Haykin on “The Baptist Story: From English Sect to Global Movement” [Iron Sharpens Iron]

IronSharpens

From a recently posted Iron Sharpens Iron Radio from July 5, 2016 with Chris Arnzen:

michael haykinDR. MICHAEL HAYKIN,
Professor of Church History & Biblical Spirituality (2008),
Director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies at
The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, KY
& author of
Baptist Story BookTHE BAPTIST STORY: From English Sect to Global Movement

2 hour audio [mp3]:

5th edition of “A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith” Coming Soon [Sam Waldron]

Sam Waldron:

Sam Waldron 1689 commentaryThe Manuscript for the 5th edition of A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith has been sent to the publisher!  Over the next few weeks we plan to share some insights, additions and improvements that you can expect to see in the new edition.

I want to enlarge on the improvements in the 5th edition of A Modern Exposition.

One of the major improvements, I hope, is in the expanded appendices at the end of the exposition.

Dr. Sam Waldron
Dr. Sam Waldron

Appendix A: The Historical Origin of the 1689 … corrects some historical inaccuracies owing to the primitive state of the sources I used to construct it in the original version of the Exposition.

Appendix B: The Analytical Outline of the 1689 … is a development of an outline I originally borrowed from Greg Nichols. It is now refined by the insights I have gleaned from Jim Renihan’s teaching on the structure of the Confession.

Appendix C: The Doctrinal Overview of the 1689 Baptist Confession is entirely new. It provides an argument that the Confession embodies a tradition which combines historic (catholic) orthodoxy with Reformed theology and Baptist principles.

Appendix D: The Proper Holding of the 1689 Baptist Confession is my response to the notion that the membership in a confessional church requires full subscription and that, therefore, the 1689 is too detailed to be a good, local church confession. I argue that elders must teach the Confession and thus fully subscribe, but members need only sweetly submit to the Confession and need not fully subscribe. This article has been posted on Founders.org  for some years now. How (and Why) Your Church Should Hold to the 1689 Confession

[See also this new preface snippet and the clearer acknowledgement for Dr. Robert Paul Martin’s defense of the importance of creeds and confessions.]

Thoughts on Christian Liberty [Tom Ascol]

Tom Ascol, over at Founders, writes:

With the resurgence of reformed theology has come a rediscovery of the doctrine of Christian liberty. This doctrine is important for spiritual growth and health because, as Paul succinctly put it in Galatians 5:1, “For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery.”…

christian-liberty-02_620Quite simply, Christian liberty is the freedom to live in ways that God that has not restricted by His commandments. As the Second London Confession of Faith (1689) puts it in chapter 21,

God alone is Lord of the conscience, and He has left it free from human doctrines and commandments that are in any way contrary to His Word or not contained in it. So, believing such doctrines, or obeying such commands out of conscience, is a betrayal of true liberty of conscience. Requiring implicit faith or absolute and blind obedience destroys liberty of conscience and reason as well (paragraph 2).

What God has commanded we must insist be done and do ourselves. What God has forbidden, we must insist not be done and not do. What God has neither commanded nor forbidden we are free to do or not do. Obviously, misunderstanding God’s law will inevitably lead to misunderstanding of Christian liberty.

Read “Thoughts on Christian Liberty”

How the “Uses of the law… sweetly comply with… the grace of the Gospel” (2LCF 19.7) [Richard Barcellos | PDF]

Intro to the 2016 ARBCA circular letter on the 2nd London Confession of Faith (1677/1689) chapter 19 paragraph seven:

Law-Gospel2-175x150Neither are the aforementioned uses of the law contrary to the grace of the Gospel, but do sweetly comply with it . . . (2LCF 19.7a)

Our subject is important for at least three reasons. First, because this is what we confess as confessional, associational churches. It is, therefore, what we believe the Bible teaches. Second, because it is one of those confessional assertions that is often misunderstood and, in our day, denied by prominent evangelicals.1 And third, it is important for the well-being of our churches, which are comprised of God’s dear children. This last reason will be examined more fully in the conclusion.

In addressing the issue of how the “uses of the law . . . sweetly comply with the grace of the Gospel” (2LCF 19.7), we will consider 2LCF 19.7 in its confessional context, define some technical terms utilized in discussions about the law of God, identify the “uses of the law” implied by this paragraph, and discuss how the “uses of the law . . . sweetly comply with the grace of the Gospel.” A conclusion to the whole will be our final consideration of this topic in light of the discussion.

Read the rest here or in the below 10-page PDF:

Download (PDF, 391KB)

Now on Kindle $4.99: “Faith and Life for Baptists: The Documents of the London Particular Baptist General Assemblies, 1689-1694” [RBAP]

Faith and Life Cover

Faith and Life for Baptists:
The Documents of the London Particular Baptist General Assemblies, 1689-1694

Edited by James M. Renihan

$4.99

Description:

The documents of the London Particular Baptist General Assemblies, 1689-1694, are contained in this book. Each General Assembly published a Narrative of its acts, and several supporting documents were also released. The 1677Confession of Faith (2LCF) was promoted, a defense of the necessity of financial support for pastors printed, a Catechism authorized, and other subordinate but important papers ordered. All of these documents are incorporated here, so far as the editor knows, some of them for the first time in print since the seventeenth century.

Details:

Print Length: 462 pages
Publisher: Reformed Baptist Academic Press
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
Lending: Enabled

Foreword by Larry K. Kreitzer.

Endorsements by Crawford Gribben, Tom Nettles, Michael Haykin, Robert Oliver, Sam Waldron, Jonathan Arnold, Barry Howson, and Steve Weaver.

Recovering our Confessional Heritage: A new series of small books coming from IRBS [RBAP]

Cov of Works - ROCHReformed Baptist Academic Press:

The purpose of the series Recovering our Confessional Heritage is to address issues related to the Second London Confession of Faith of 1677/89 (2LCF). This centuries-old Confession is widely recognized as the most important Confession of Faith in Baptist history. First published in England in 1677, it became the standard for Baptists in Colonial America through the publication of the Philadelphia (1742), Ketockton, Virginia (1766), Charleston, South Carolina, Warren, Rhode Island (both 1767), and many other editions of the Confession. As late as 1881, William Cathcart, the editor of The Baptist Encyclopedia, could say, “In England and America, churches, individuals, and Associations, with clear minds, with hearts full of love for the truth, . . . have held with veneration the articles of 1689.” Since then, it has been adopted by Baptists around the world and translated into many languages.

We believe that, due to two factors, producing a series of short books on the 2LCF will be useful to many pastors and church members. First, there has been increased interest in the 2LCF in the first decade and a half of the twenty-first century. In fact, from the early 1960s, a greater awareness of this Confession among Baptists in the United States and around the world is evident. One of the encouraging proofs of this growing attention is the multiplication of churches who identify the 2LCF as their confessional standard.

Second, there are many issues related to the Confession that need to be clearly and cogently explained in order for an informed and robust recovery of Baptist confessionalism to continue. While churches and individuals have formally adopted the 2LCF as a standard, it has not always been clear that its contents have been fully or properly understood. As a result, the goal of this series is to aid those considering the 2LCF, as well as those already committed to it, in order to produce or maintain an informed and vigorous Baptist confessionalism.

The series will include treatments of various subjects by multiple authors. The subjects to be covered are those the series editors (along with consultants) determine to be of particular interest in our day. The authors will be those who display ample ability to address the issue under discussion. Some of the installments will be more involved than others due to the nature of the subject addressed and perceived current needs. Many of the contributions will cover foundational aspects of the self-consistent theological system expressed in the Confession. Others will address difficult, often misunderstood, or even denied facets of the doctrinal formulations of the 2LCF. Each installment will have a “For Further Reading” bibliography at the end to encourage further study on the issue discussed.

It is hoped that, by the blessing of God, these brief books will produce a better understanding of “the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” (Jude 3, NKJV) as well as a clearer and more robust understanding of what it means to confess the 2LCF in the twenty-first century.

James M. Renihan, Editor-in-Chief

Richard C. Barcellos, Managing Editor

October 2016

1689 Confession Translated into Chechewa for the First Time

scott_mike_confession_1689_320_240Pastor Scott Brown:

Our church coordinated with pastors from Malawi to create the first Chechewa translation of the Baptist Confession of 1689. Chechewa is the language of Malawi and Zambia. Our church has been involved with two churches in Malawi for church planting and equipping. Our friends at Chapel Library have published it and it is available now from them. Nate Maxon, a son from the missionary family of Frank Maxon, who grew up in Malawi, is an accomplished Chichewa linguist also worked on the translation.  In September there will be a weeklong conference, coordinated by Antioch Baptist Church in Blantyre. 

Please pray for the men will be preaching through this confession in Blantyre Malawi, Malamulo Chindongo, Julius Chapola, Masa Elias, Victor Nyirenda, (Members of Antioch Baptist Church – host church). Newton Chilingulo, Kennedy Kachingwe, Emmanuel Mpeni (Members of Reformation Bible Church – Lilongwe), Jason Dohm and Michael Templeton.

Today is the 50th Anniversary of the first gathering of the modern Reformed Baptists in America [Tom Chantry]

Tom Chantry:

Walter J. Chantry
Walter J. Chantry

“…Thus many of us seem to be as men without a country, or as odd individualists in other fellowships. Yet we do not relish the spirit of total independency which is plagued with weakness. Perhaps it is time to begin a Fellowship of like-minded brethren for mutual edification and encouragement…” – Walter J. Chantry, 1966

It is possible to posit a variety of dates for the beginning of the Reformed Baptist movement in America. The first of the modern Reformed Baptist churches was started in 1951. The same church adopted the 1689 Confession in 1958. Ernie Reisinger and Walt Chantry met Al Martin for the first time in 1965. However, if the question is when a movement of churches began, the answer must be fifty years ago today – June 7, 1966.

That day, which in 1966 also fell on a Tuesday, was marked by the opening of the first of the Carlisle Pastors Conferences which were the first attempt to form a more formal communion among those churches which subscribed to the 1689 Confession. The conferences were hosted by Grace Baptist Church of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, of which Chantry was pastor. The reason is expressed in the quote above, drawn from the letter of invitation sent to those Calvinistic Baptists known to the Carlisle church…

Read “Remembering June 7, 1966

New Book: “Faith and Life for Baptists: The Documents of the London Particular Baptist General Assemblies, 1689-1694” [RBAP]

Faith and Life Cover

Faith and Life for Baptists:
The Documents of the London Particular Baptist General Assemblies, 1689-1694

Edited by James M. Renihan

Description:

The documents of the London Particular Baptist General Assemblies, 1689-1694, are contained in this book. Each General Assembly published aNarrative of its acts, and several supporting documents were also released. The 1677Confession of Faith (2LCF) was promoted, a defense of the necessity of financial support for pastors printed, a Catechism authorized, and other subordinate but important papers ordered. All of these documents are incorporated here, so far as the editor knows, some of them for the first time in print since the seventeenth century.

Details:

462 pages
Published 2016 {Reformed Baptist Academic Press]

Foreword by Larry K. Kreitzer.

Endorsements by Crawford Gribben, Tom Nettles, Michael Haykin, Robert Oliver, Sam Waldron, Jonathan Arnold, Barry Howson, and Steve Weaver.

ARBCA 2016 General Assembly audio now online. Feat. Miller, J. Renihan, D. Lindblad, Crosby, Hodgins, Slate, Waters

arbca gaAudio from the 2016 Association of Reformed Baptist Churches of America (ARBCA) General Assembly [which took place on April 26-28, 2016 at Grace Reformed Baptist Church in Rockford, Illinois] , is now online:

Devotional John 17:1-5 | Thomas Waters [mp3]:

Redemption Accomplished | Pastor Jerry Slate [mp3]:

A Defense of Confessionalism | Arden Hodgins [mp3]:

A Tale of Two Associations Revisited | James M. Renihan [mp3]:

Devotional John 17:6-19 | Rob Cosby [mp3]:

Propitiation Accomplished | Don Lindblad [mp3]:

Associational Churchmanship: LBC 26:12-15 | James M. Renihan [mp3]:

Devotional John 17:20-26 | John Miller [mp3]:

Consider the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith [J. Ryan Davidson]

1689 Leather EditionJ. Ryan Davidson:

Huddled together in 1644, representatives of 7 churches gathered to summarize their common confession, and to distinguish themselves from the Anabaptists and the Arminians. It was a time of turmoil, and the river of the Reformation had swept across the banks of London. This was one of the first of several non-Anglican groups in that century to put pen to paper and confess their faith. Two years later, the Westminster Assembly would produce its own confession (WCF), and then in 1658, the Congregationalists would follow suit (Savoy Declaration). That original group of 7 churches was the Particular Baptists. Amid persecution, and to show their solidarity and theological agreement in many ways with the Presbyterians and Congregationalists that had since written their own confessions, a larger crop of Baptists would draft the 1677 Baptist Confession with great reliance on the WCF and Savoy, however due to persecution, this document would not be published until 1689, giving it the name that it is known by today: “The 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith”. This Confession was classically theist in its view of God, covenantal in its view of Biblical Theology, “Calvinist” in its soteriology, and would show alignment with the Westminster Confession of Faith on the Ordinary Means of Grace and the Law. I grew up Baptist, became Calvinistic in my soteriology in my teen years, and have found a wonderful home in the confessional roots of Baptist theology as a pastor in my mid-thirties. To me, this Historic Confession, similar to the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Savoy Declaration, is worth considering for at least five reasons:

  1. For Baptists influenced by the ‘New Calvinism’, it is helpful to see that for Baptists, Calvinism is not “new”…

  2. It contains a wonderful vision for the Christian life…

  3. There is value in saying more sometimes…

  4. Historic Confessions ground us…

  5. Believer’s Baptism has much of its roots in a Covenant Theology…

Read the explanations of each of the five above points.

The 1689 Baptist Confession on the Role of Civil Government [Tom Hicks]

Government

Pastor Tom Hicks
Pastor Tom Hicks

Historically, American Calvinistic Baptists have been fairly unified on their understanding of the role of civil government. They expressed their views in various confessions but the the Second London Baptist Confession was their mother confession. In Chapter 24, Of the Civil Magistrate, it provides the historic Calvinistic Baptist understanding of the role of civil government. It reads:

CHAPTER 24; OF THE CIVIL MAGISTRATE

Paragraph 1. God, the supreme Lord and King of all the world, has ordained civil magistrates to be under him, over the people, for his own glory and the public good; and to this end has armed them with the power of the sword, for defence and encouragement of them that do good, and for the punishment of evil doers.1
1 Rom. 13:1-4

1689 gift editionParagraph 2. It is lawful for Christians to accept and execute the office of a magistrate when called thereunto; in the management whereof, as they ought especially to maintain justice and peace,2 according to the wholesome laws of each kingdom and commonwealth, so for that end they may lawfully now, under the New Testament, wage war upon just and necessary occasions.3
2 2 Sam. 23:3; Ps. 82:3,4
3 Luke 3:14

Paragraph 3. Civil magistrates being set up by God for the ends aforesaid; subjection, in all lawful things commanded by them, ought to be yielded by us in the Lord, not only for wrath, but for conscience’ sake;4 and we ought to make supplications and prayers for kings and all that are in authority, that under them we may live a quiet and peaceable life, in all godliness and honesty.5
4 Rom. 13:5-7; 1 Pet. 2:17
5 1 Tim. 2:1,2

This chapter is divided into 3 sections. Paragraph 1 is on God’s ordination of the civil magistrate. Paragraph 2 is about Christians who hold the office of civil magistrate. Paragraph 3 is about how Christians should submit to the civil magistrate. We’ll look at these one at a time…

Pastor Tom Hicks goes on to explain each of these paragraphs.

New Booklet: “1689 Confession’s Influence on Early American Missons & Church Planting” by Steve Weaver

weaver_fullcolor

The 1689 Baptist Confession and Its Influence on Early American Missons and Church Planting

by Steve Weaver

Description:

Pastor Steve Weaver
Pastor Steve Weaver

By showing that the original signers of the confession were evangelistic and missions-minded and by showing that those who held to the confession in North America were also evangelistic and missions-minded, it is hoped that we can lay to rest the mistaken notion that those who held to the 1689 Baptist Confession and its theological descendants in America – the Philadelphia and Charleston Confessions – were unconcerned and uninvolved in the work of missions and church planting.

Details:

  • $2.00
  • 80 lb. cover
  • Staple-booklet binding
  • 35 pgs.
  • Published by Reformed Baptist Faith and Family Ministry

Reformed Baptist Faith and Family MinistryReformed Baptist Faith & Family (RBFF) is a non-profit Christian printing and publishing ministry, which exists to provide the Churches of Jesus Christ with quality resources aimed at equipping, exhorting and encouraging her members while remaining committed to the biblical truths as preserved in the 1689 Second London Baptist Confession of Faith (1689 Baptist Confession).

 

AUDIO from the 2016 “1689 Conference: The Reign of Grace” now online feat. Baines, Waldron, Hall, & Waters

Audio from the 2016 “1689 Conference”, which took place on March 18-19, is now online (videos coming soon):

1689conf 2016 audio

That as sin hath reigned unto death, even so might grace reign through righteousness
unto eternal life by Jesus Christ our Lord. Romans 5:21 (KJV)

Description:

1689 ConfIt seems as though in the year 2015 there has been many challenges facing us as Christians, both from outside our walls and from within.

The church needs to be encouraged with the reminder of the steadfastness and surety of God’s reign through grace,
which will not be thwarted by sin nor traitors in our ranks.

If it would please the Lord, we are hoping to achieve several things with this year’s theme: REIGN of GRACE.

Beginning on Friday we hope to provide an overview concerning a very important way in how to understand God’s redemptive plan which is interwoven all throughout the Scriptures – the Covenant of Grace. This Covenant is central to the 1689 Baptist Confession and is sure to provide God’s people with confidence and renewed hope that the Lord fulfills His promises!

Then on Saturday, following the reassurance and reminder of the promises and plans made to Christ’s people, we will offer teachings that have a more practical mood, in hopes they may exhort, encourage and equip those in attendance to continue to fight the good fight,
and not to grow weary in well doing.

So then, please join us that we may continue steadfastly unto the end in the most holy faith which we confess.
Come, gather and meet new friends who share with you in precious like faith.

2016 Audio Sessions:

Day One Audio

TALK #1
Rev. Ron Baines – Of God’s covenant of grace (this topic is also further expanded in Ron’s second talk – #5):

TALK #2
Dr. Sam Waldron – Of Jesus Christ the Mediator by which grace reigns.:

TALK #3
Rev. Mike Waters – Of reigning grace through repentance and salvation.:

TALK #4
Rev. JD Hall – Of reigning grace and our proclamation of the gospel.:

TALK #5
Rev. Ron Baines – Of reigning grace in and through the local church.:

TALK #6
Dr. Sam Waldron – The Consummation of the glorious reign of grace.:

Day Two Audio

TALK #7
Rev. JD Hall – Of reigning grace and our Perseverance during this life.:

TALK #8
Dr. Sam Waldron – Of reigning grace and new church planting.:

TALK #9
Rev. JD Hall – Of reigning grace and passing on our beliefs to the next generation.:

TALK #10
Rev. Ron Baines – Of the reign of grace and fleeing worldliness.:

TALK #11
Rev. Mike Waters – The reign of grace through martyrdom.:

TALK #12
Rev. Mike Waters – The reign of grace in self-denial.: