5 Minutes in Church History Podcast on Baptist Confessions [AUDIO]

Dr. Stephen Nichols highlights the history of baptists from London to Philadelphia in the latest episode of 5 Minutes in Church History:

Listen Here:

Transcript:

London to Philadelphia—you might think that this has to do with transatlantic flights. Well, it doesn’t. It has to do with confessions of faith—Baptist confessions of faith, to be exact. First, there is the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith, also known as the Second London Baptist Confession, and then there is the Philadelphia Confession of Faith.

The Baptists came into being early in the 1600s in England. These were Puritans. They had all left the Anglican Church and were part of the larger group of people that we call Nonconformists, meaning they would not conform to the established church, the Church of England. These Baptists were not only separated out from the Anglicans, but these Baptists also believed in adult or believer’s baptism, which set them apart from some of the other Nonconformists. It set them apart from the Presbyterians and it set them apart from the Congregationalists.

In 1644, the Baptists gathered together and wrote the First London Baptist Confession. It was very much like the Westminster Standards, but of course it differed in the chapters on church polity or church government and on baptism.

In 1677, they gathered again to refresh this confession and had a number of people sign off on it, but there were also some who couldn’t sign off. This was a time of intense persecution in England, and there were many who were simply not able to align themselves with this statement.

Read more

 

 

6 Replies to “5 Minutes in Church History Podcast on Baptist Confessions [AUDIO]”

    1. Actually, this is quite inaccurate. For example, there is no evidence that ‘Baptists’ gathered together in 1677 to ‘refresh’ the 1644 LCF; who are the ones “who couldn’t sign off’? The General Baptists? That fault line was present long before 1677. And his comments seem to imply that the ‘1689’ Confession differs from the 1677 edition. This is not a helpful 5 minutes in Church history.

      1. Does Ligonier have a history of printing or making retractions? Granted, 5 minutes isn’t a lot of time, but a church history should be accurate. If a history podcast isn’t accurate it will lose its credibility and hopefully its audience. I don’t want to see that happen to Dr. Nichols’ podcast. I’ve tweeted Dr. Nichols. Hopefully someone will get his attention with proper corrections.

      2. Just listened to this,… ya, very confusing. Bad show. He also says of the 1644 what he should have said of the 1677/1689:

        “In 1644, the Baptists gathered together and wrote the First London Baptist Confession. It was very much like the Westminster Standards, but of course it differed in the chapters on church polity or church government and on baptism.”

        That is true of the 1677/1689 (technically the Confession, not all the Standards). The 1644 was before the Westminster Confession. Weird.

        Also, he just talks about “Baptists” with no mention of General or Particular… even though he just mentions Particular Baptist confessions. Ya, bad show :( too bad, cause I love this podcast.

  1. Sorry for any inaccuracies and confusing statements during this episode of 5 Minutes in Church History. Thank you for setting the record straight. My intention was to draw attention to these rich confessions from the history of the Christian tradition. Thanks for listening.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *